SYRIA / SHEEP FARMER

12-Oct-2017 00:01:43
In Syria, conflict has had a severe impact not only on people but also on the livestock on which they depend. The number of cattle has decreased by more than 30 percent in recent years, whilst the number of sheep and goats decreased by 40 percent. UNIFEED
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STORY: SYRIA / SHEEP FARMER
TRT: 01:43
SOURCE: FAO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 18 JULY 2017, AL GHEZLANEYE, SYRIA
SHOTLIST
1. Tilt down, veterinarian preparing spray for parasites control
2. Various shots, veterinarian spraying parasiticidals on sheep
3. Med shot, children
4. Various shots, veterinarian giving treatment to sheep
5. Various shots, Abu Hasan feeding sheep
6. Wide shot, Abu Hasan giving water to sheep
7. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abu Hasan, Internally Displaced Farmer:
“We left our village because of the armed conflict, we moved to this area and have been here for four years.”
8. Wide shot, Abu Hasan and his children
9. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abu Hasan, Internally Displaced Farmer:
“We worked very hard to rebuild our life here.”
10. Wide shot, child
(Audio as incoming)
11. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Um Yazan, Internally Displaced Farmer:
“Look at the children, our life is difficult here, we live in tents and the weather is very hot here, no electricity and no cold water, our life is hard here.”
12. Close up, veterinarian giving treatment to sheep
(Audio as incoming)
13. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Um Yazan, Internally Displaced Farmer:
“Thank god the treatment protected our sheep from diseases. There are no diseases now. Thanks to the vets who took care of this.”
Med shot, Um Yazan milking a sheep
14. Wide shot, Um Yazan carrying milk
STORYLINE
In Syria, conflict has had a severe impact not only on people but also on the livestock on which they depend. The number of cattle has decreased by more than 30 percent in recent years, whilst the number of sheep and goats decreased by 40 percent.

Abu Hasan and his family were forced to leave Eastern Ghouta- an area ravaged by war for the past four years, some 15 kilometres from Syria’s capital, Damascus.

Hasan, a father of 14 children, has been trying to establish a proper living situation through the cattle he owns since they were displaced 4 years ago.

Hasan said “we left our village because of the armed conflict – we moved to this area and been here for four years,” adding, “we worked very hard to rebuild our life here.”

Um Yazan, who comes from Mansoura, in Eastern Ghouta, was forced to leave her place with her husband and six children to AL Ghezlaneye after her area was attacked.

They left everything behind, except some of their sheep. This was two years ago.

Since then, they have been living in tents, in extremely precarious conditions. There is no infrastructure, no electricity, no water.

Um Yazan said “look at the children, our life is difficult here, we live in tents and the weather is very hot here, no electricity and no cold water, our life is hard here.”

She and her children are trying to work to earn some money. They sometimes sell vegetables. They make about US 50 cents (300 Syrian pounds) a day. Enough to buy some bread, oil and sugar.
The family’s main source of livelihoods are the sheep.

Um Yazan said “they don’t give us that much milk but we are grateful for what we have.”

Delivering veterinary services has been seriously restricted. Vaccination campaigns and programmes to prevent or curb diseases are only possible in the safer areas. Production facilities have been severely damaged, which has led to a shortage of vaccines.

In view that livestock can be a matter of life and death for people living in rural communities as they depend on them for their very survival, protecting the remaining of animals is critical.

Um Yazan said “thank God that the treatment protected our sheep from diseases. There are no diseases now. Thanks to the vets who took care of our animals. They saved us money. We couldn’t have afforded to pay for a vet.”

FAO and the Syria Veterinary Medical Association carried out an animal health campaign earlier this year to protect 1.3 million sheep and goats, and 65,000 cattle from highly contagious diseases. The three-month campaign has benefitted more than 200,000 livestock owners. This initiative was possible thanks to support from the United States.
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