WHO / CHILD ADOLESCENT OBESITY

10-Oct-2017 00:03:32
The number of obese children and adolescents (aged five to 19 years) worldwide has risen tenfold in the past four decades. If current trends continue, more children and adolescents will be obese than moderately or severely underweight by 2022, according to a new WHO report released today. WHO
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STORY: WHO / CHILD ADOLESCENT OBESITY
TRT: 3:32
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTION: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 09 OCTOBER 2017, WHO HEADQUARTERS, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST
09 OCTOBER 2017, WHO HEADQUARTERS, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Close up, report
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Fiona Bull, Program Manager, Noncommunicable Diseases Surveillance and Population-based Prevention, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Today we are launching the Recommendations from the WHO’s on Ending Childhood Obesity, which sets out six recommendations of policy actions for countries to tackle obesity and overweight in young children.”
3. Close up, report
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Fiona Bull, Program Manager, Noncommunicable Diseases Surveillance and Population-based Prevention, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The six areas include mass media campaigns to raise everyone’s awareness on the consequences and the causes of overweight and obesity. Secondly, fiscal and regulatory interventions, upstream actions to change the obesogenic environment and make healthy choices the easier choices. This includes things like implementation of restrictions of marketing, food labelling and possible taxing on high fat, high sugar foods. A second area is school setting, making sure our children have access to healthy foods and physical activity. A third setting is in the physical activity area more broadly, looking at parks, sports, availability and safe ways to walk and cycle more often. And that will help children be more active and that helps maintain a healthy weight.”

FILE – WHO - APRIL 2011, BOLIVIA

5. Various shots, health education in streets about weight and height control and its importance for children.

09 OCTOBER 2017, WHO HEADQUARTERS, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Fiona Bull, Program Manager, Noncommunicable Diseases Surveillance and Population-based Prevention, World Health Organization (WHO):
“These actions are all feasible for all countries to tackle ending obesity and overweight in children. Countries will start at different places, perhaps in the schools, perhaps in the physical activity, perhaps in the public education and awareness and the regulatory and marketing, but all countries can tackle obesity through these six recommendations.”

FILE – WHO - APRIL 2011, BOLIVIA

7. Various shots, health education in streets about weight and height control and its importance for children.

09 OCTOBER 2017, WHO HEADQUARTERS, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Fiona Bull, Program Manager, Noncommunicable Diseases Surveillance and Population-based Prevention, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Obesity is one of the main causes of non-communicable diseases, heart disease, diabetes, cancers…that are costing health care systems lots of money and expected to rise over the coming decades due to population growth and the ageing population.”

FILE – WHO - APRIL 2011, BOLIVIA

9. Various shots, health education in streets about weight and height control and its importance for children.

09 OCTOBER 2017, WHO HEADQUARTERS, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Leanne Riley, Team Leader, Noncommunicable Diseases Surveillance and Population-based Prevention, World Health Organization (WHO):
“So our studies looked at what has happened over the last four decades and it shows a tenfold increase over the last four decades.”

FILE – WHO - MARCH 2015, FUJI

11. Various shots, food selling in streets with diet concerns

09 OCTOBER 2017, WHO HEADQUARTERS, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Leanne Riley, Team Leader, Noncommunicable Diseases Surveillance and Population-based Prevention, World Health Organization (WHO):
“This is linked to changes in diet and more physical inactivity and sedentary behavior in these young people.”

FILE – WHO - MARCH 2015, FUJI

13. Various shots, food selling in streets with diet concerns

09 OCTOBER 2017, WHO HEADQUARTERS, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

14. SOUNDBITE (English) Leanne Riley, Team Leader, Noncommunicable Diseases Surveillance and Population-based Prevention, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Being an overweight child or adolescent means you are more likely to be an overweight adult and it is also more likely to lead to early onset of conditions like heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Overweight in childhood and adolescence also causes social psychological problems for the children themselves, more stigmatism, more bullying, less optimal school performance.”

FILE – WHO - MARCH 2015, FUJI

15. Various shots, food selling in streets with diet concerns
STORYLINE
The number of obese children and adolescents (aged five to 19 years) worldwide has risen tenfold in the past four decades. If current trends continue, more children and adolescents will be obese than moderately or severely underweight by 2022, according to a new WHO report released today (10 Oct).

Obesity rates in the world’s children and adolescents increased from less than 1% (equivalent to five million girls and six million boys) in 1975 to nearly 6% in girls (50 million) and nearly 8% in boys (74 million) in 2016. Combined, the number of obese five to 19 year olds rose more than tenfold globally, from 11 million in 1975 to 124 million in 2016. An additional 213 million were overweight in 2016 but fell below the threshold for obesity.

On the six recommendations of policy actions for countries to tackle obesity and overweight in young children, Fiona Bull, a programme manager from World Health Organization said that it includes mass media campaigns to raise awareness on the consequences and the causes of overweight and obesity, fiscal and regulatory interventions, upstream actions to change the obesogenic environment and make healthy choices the easier choices.

She added that “these actions are all feasible for all countries to tackle ending obesity and overweight in children. Countries will start at different places, perhaps in the schools, perhaps in the physical activity, perhaps in the public education and awareness and the regulatory and marketing, but all countries can tackle obesity through these six recommendations.”

Bull also mentioned that “obesity is one of the main causes of non-communicable diseases, heart disease, diabetes, cancers, that are costing health care systems lots of money and expected to rise over the coming decades due to population growth and the ageing population.”

Leanne Riley, a team leader from WHO said that the number of obese children and adolescents worldwide has risen tenfold in the past four decades “is linked to changes in diet and more physical inactivity and sedentary behavior in these young people.”

She also said “being an overweight child or adolescent means you are more likely to be an overweight adult and it is also more likely to lead to early onset of conditions like heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Overweight in childhood and adolescence also causes social psychological problems for the children themselves, more stigmatism, more bullying, less optimal school performance.”

The study was published in The Lancet ahead of World Obesity Day (11 October). It analysed weight and height measurements from nearly 130 million people aged over five years (31.5 million people aged five to 19, and 97.4 million aged 20 and older), making it the largest ever number of participants involved in an epidemiological study. More than 1000 contributors participated in the study, which looked at body mass index (BMI) and how obesity has changed worldwide from 1975 to 2016.

Our study shows that there are now 124 million children and adolescents in the world who are obese and an additional 214 million overweight children and adolescent.
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