UN / YEMEN

10-Oct-2017 00:03:11
UN Special Envoy for Yemen Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed said the Yemeni people are getting poorer while leaders “get richer and refuse solutions because if they agreed to them they would lose their ability to dominate and control.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / YEMEN
TRT: 03:11
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 10 OCTOBER 2017, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

10 OCTOBER 2017, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed, Special Envoy for Yemen, United Nations:
“In Yemen, there are no winners on the battlefield and the Yemeni people remain the biggest losers who are paying the highest price for this war. The people are getting poorer while leaders get richer and refuse solutions because if they agreed to them they would lose their ability to dominate and control. The parties have to commit to end all hostilities and start discussions for a comprehensive peace agreement. They must also find common ground to relieve the effects of conflict, hunger and disease and increase the trust among each other.”
4. Med shot, Ging
5. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed, Special Envoy for Yemen, United Nations:
“The most dangerous thing in war is for us to become used to it. The bloodshed and the destruction of the country must end as soon as possible. There are no excuses. There are no justifications. People are asking the United Nations for a solution regarding the payment of salaries while others are placing impossible preconditions as if they were ignorant to the suffering of millions of Yemenis.”
6. Med shot, delegates
7. SOUNDBITE (English) John Ging, Director of the Operational Division at the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
“These obstacles are abhorrent in a country where the threat of famine looms over millions, where there are over 800,000 suspected cholera cases across 90 percent of communities and where only 45 percent of health facilities are functioning. Quite simply, these obstructions cost lives.”
8. Med shot, delegates
9. SOUNDBITE (English) John Ging, Director of the Operational Division at the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:
“Even if the fighting stopped today, stunted growth and delayed cognitive development will linger for an entire generation of children. The loss of livelihoods for adults also means thousands of
children are forced to work rather than go to school, with child marriage rates also increasing as families claim incapacity to support their children.”
10. Med shot, Security Council
11. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Khaled Hussein Mohamed Alyemany, Permanent Representative of Yemen to the United Nations:
“Sustainable peace will not be achieved unless Iran stops interfering in Yemen’s affairs and the affairs of the region. The world is called upon to stand together to reign in Iran’s expansionist greed. The oppressive mullahs’ regime which was rejected by the Iranian people cannot be imposed on us in Yemen.”
12. Med shot, Ould Cheikh Ahmed
13. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Khaled Hussein Mohamed Alyemany, Permanent Representative of Yemen to the United Nations:
“Dealing with the Yemeni crisis by focusing only on the humanitarian aspect, despite the importance of this aspect, without giving the political aspect the importance it deserves and working towards reaching a sustainable political solution to the Yemeni crisis, is nothing but a patchwork effort aimed at prolonging the war and prolonging the suffering which was a direct result of the rebellion against the State carried out by the Houthi-Salah militias. Therefore, the seriousness of the Security Council to resolve the humanitarian situation in Yemen is at stake because it must assist in resolving the root causes of the crisis and not only the side-effects.”
14. Wide shot, Security Council
STORYLINE
UN Special Envoy for Yemen Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed said the Yemeni people are getting poorer while leaders “get richer and refuse solutions because if they agreed to them they would lose their ability to dominate and control.”

Speaking at the Security Council today (10 Oct), Ould Cheikh Ahmed said there are “no winners on the battlefield” in Yemen and called on all parties to find common ground to “relieve the effects of conflict, hunger, and disease and increase the trust among each other.” He stressed that the recent sharp increase in civilian casualties shows the parties’ continued disregard for the loss of civilian life and their obligations under international humanitarian law.

The Special Envoy reminded the Council that the conflict in Yemen was creating a desperate situation in every facet of daily life as the economy is shrinking and millions of government employees continue not to receive salary payments. He told the Council he is currently in the process of discussing a new proposal with the Yemeni Government and the alliance of the Houthis and General People’s Congress that includes humanitarian initiatives to rebuild trust and steps to bring the parties back to the negotiations table. He hoped that commitments made by the parties will translate into action and deepen their engagement based on these initiatives in order to reach a peaceful political solution.

Ould Cheikh Ahmed emphasised that the “most dangerous thing in war is for us to become used to it” adding that the bloodshed in Yemen must end as soon as possible. He said, “There are no excuses; there are no justifications; people are asking the United Nations for a solution regarding the payment of salaries while others are placing impossible preconditions as if they were ignorant to the suffering of millions of Yemenis.”

UN humanitarian office (OCHA) director of operations, John Ging, said some 15 million people in Yemen lack adequate access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene, or health services, while seven million people are faced with the threat of famine. Ging said humanitarians face unacceptable obstacles from all sides in carrying out relief efforts in the country. He underlined that these obstacles “are abhorrent in a country where the threat of famine looms over millions, where there are over 800,000 suspected cholera cases across 90 percent of communities and where only 45 percent of health facilities are functioning; quite simply, these obstructions cost lives.”

Yemeni ambassador Khaled Alyemany said sustainable peace will not be achieved “unless Iran stops interfering in Yemen’s affairs and the affairs of the region.” He said a one-sided ceasefire cannot achieve peace and called on the world to “stand together to reign in Iran’s expansionist greed.” He said, “The oppressive mullahs’ regime which was rejected by the Iranian people cannot be imposed on us in Yemen.” Alyemany said the Houthi militias are using the crises facing Yemen to achieve Iranian objectives to destabilize the region adding that the group did not have the political will to reach an agreement to end the conflict because that will lies outside of the country.

The Yemeni ambassador said dealing with the Yemeni crisis by focusing only on the humanitarian aspect without giving the political aspect the importance it deserves “is nothing but a patchwork effort aimed at prolonging the war and prolonging the suffering which was a direct result of the rebellion against the State carried out by the Houthi-Salah militias.” He said the “seriousness of the Security Council to resolve the humanitarian situation in Yemen is at stake because it must assist in resolving the root causes of the crisis and not only the side-effects.”
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