BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA REFUGEES HEALTH

04-Oct-2017 00:03:15
Five weeks into the recent Rohingya exodus from Myanmar, over half a million more refugees are now across the border in Bangladesh, putting strains on the fragile infrastructure in refugee camps and surrounding areas. UNHCR
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STORY: BANGLADESH / ROHINGYA REFUGEES HEALTH
TRT: 3:15
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTION: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / ROHINGYA

DATELINE: 30 SEPTEMBER – 03 OCTOBER 2017, KUTUPALONG REFUGEE CAMP AND KUTUPALONG EXTENSION SITE, BANGLADESH
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, women and children sitting outside Diarrhoeal Treatment Centre
2. Close up, two boys
3. Close up, sick baby being held by mother
4. Wide shot, people walking with camp in background
5. Wide shot, children by side of camp road with people walking past
6. Close up, baby crying
7. Med shot, Bijidabagum trying to comfort baby
8. SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Bijidabagum, Rohingya refugee:
“We have problem with clean water and sanitation, we don’t have proper sanitation and water our children are getting sick”
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Taimur Hassan , Assistant Public Health Officer, UNHCR:
“They are staying in the crowded space, there is not enough water, drinking water facilities as well as the toilet facilities and the recent rain is mixing up the waste with the water and many people do not have enough pure drinking water so this makes the risk higher.”
10. Wide shot, doctor examining patient at centre
11. Wide shot, doctor examining patient from different angle
12. Wide shot, patients waiting to be examined
13. Close up, patients
14. Close up, Bruce Murray asking questions at treatment centre
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Bruce Murray, Medical Teams International:
“We also hope to train community health workers here to spread the word about hand washing, clean toilet hygiene and obtaining clean water..so we hope that this will serve as a model unit to spread the word out into the community so that we can avoid watery diarrhoea and cholera’”
16. Drone shot, low level of latrines in Kutupalong
17. Med shot, young boy washing hands at wash station with latrine in background
18. Close up, washing hands
19. Med shot, children at well
20. Close up, buckets being pushed in to collect water from well tap
21. Wide shot, people at well and polluted field nearby
22. Wide shot, refugees walking in foreground polluted rice paddy behind
23. Wide shot, UNHCR field officer at well shaking vial of water
24. Close up, powder being poured into vial
25. Med shot, UNHCR field officer at well with testing kit.
26. Wide shot, group of patients waiting on bench
27. Close up, sick elderly man closing eyes
28. Med shot, inside Treatment centre medical staff talking to patient
29. Wide shot, various people walking on path in Kutupalong
STORYLINE
Five weeks into the recent Rohingya exodus from Myanmar, over half a million more refugees are now across the border in Bangladesh, putting strains on the fragile infrastructure in refugee camps and surrounding areas. UNHCR, its partners and Bangladeshi public health authorities are rushing to build sanitation systems to prevent the spread of disease.

Women and children gathering outside the first Diarrhoea Treatment Centre in Kutupalong Refugee camp. It is the children who are most vulnerable.

Acute diarrhoea kills half a million children a year around the world. And an outbreak has struck Kutupalong, the sprawling camp where Rohingyas from Myanmar have sought refuge.

Bijidabagum has seven children, and she struggles to keep them healthy.

SOUNDBITE (Rohingya) Bijidabagum, Rohingya refugee:
“We have problem with clean water and sanitation. We don’t have proper sanitation, and water our children are getting sick.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Taimur Hassan , Assistant Public Health Officer, UNHCR:
“They are staying in the crowded space. There is not enough water, drinking water facilities, as well as the toilet facilities. And the recent rain is mixing up the waste with the water, and many people do not have enough pure drinking water. So, this makes the risk higher.”

UNHCR, its partners, along with Bangladeshi health authorities, opened this treatment centre to tackle that risk. Each patient is carefully screened for any symptoms of acute diarrhoea.

It is a 20-bed facility, and patients can be isolated if necessary. Cholera is endemic in Bangladesh, and it could spread quickly in a camp like Kutapalong.

Dr. Bruce Murray is one of the lead doctors at the treatment centre. He understands the importance of moving quickly – not just here at the new centre but out in the community.

SOUNDBITE (English) Bruce Murray, Medical Teams International:
“We also hope to train community health workers here to spread the word about hand-washing, clean toilet hygiene and obtaining clean water. So we hope that this will serve as a model unit to spread the word out into the community so that we can avoid watery diarrhoea and cholera.”

UNHCR has already begun a comprehensive program of latrine building. And right next to those latrines: handwashing stations, key to preventing the spread of disease.

Wells were installed to provide water for the waves of new refugees. But the sheer numbers, the speed of their arrival, was overwhelming. Latrines simply couldn’t be built fast enough.

Many of the areas near the wells, like this rice paddy, were quickly contaminated with human waste.

UNHCR is mobilizing experts to test water quality, to ensure the wells are not contaminated.

This portable kit allows for quick testing. Results are ready in 24 hours.

This well turned out to be safe.

But the risk remains high, the arrival of the first patients at this specialized treatment centre underscores the need. Two more centres like this will be opened within the coming week

It is hoped that these combined efforts will contain the outbreak of acute diarrhoea and substantially lower the risk to refugees in Kutupalong.
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