GENEVA / SIERRA LEONE

18-Aug-2017 00:03:19
Following the devastating floods and landslides on August 14 in Sierra Leone where more than 400 people were killed and several hundred are still missing, the government and the United Nations resident coordinator have asked now for international relief operations. UNTV CH/UNICEF
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STORY: GENEVA / SIERRA LEONE LANDSLIDES
TRT: 2:36”
SOURCE: UNTV CH /UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 18 AUGUST 2017 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / 15 AUGUST 2017, FREETOWN, SIERRA LEONE
SHOTLIST
UNTV CH - 18 AUGUST 2017 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, exterior, Palais des Nations
2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Jens Laerke, Spokesperson for the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“I want to stress that the government and the resident coordinator of the UN also in the country, requested international support. That was on the 16th, so two days ago. Clearly, we have mobilised immediately, we from OCHA side are standing up, mounting a what we call an UNDAC mission, a UN Disaster and Assessment Coordination mission. It will be a total of seven people. They will begin to deploy today”.
4. Close up, journalist
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Christophe Boulierac, Spokesperson for the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF):
“Malaria is also among the biggest killer of children under 5 and we are at the peak of the rainy season which is the annual high point for Malaria death. Malaria contributes to an estimate of 20 percent of child mortality in Sierra Leone and is the cause of nearly four in 10 hospital consultations countrywide”.
6. Med shot, journalists
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Christian Lindmeier, Spokesperson for the World Health Organisation (WHO):
“Flooding creates breeding grounds for mosquitoes and can cause or most likely does cause an increase in Malaria and other vector born diseases. Trauma is a major issue for those affected by the tragedy, hundreds of lives have been lost and many families displaced. Psychosocial support will be critical to help people manage to grieve and loss they suffered as a result”.
8. Med shot, journalists
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Christian Lindmeier, Spokesperson for the World Health Organisation (WHO): “We are helping to ensure that dead bodies are managed safely and with dignity in Sierra Leone while protecting the health of frontline health workers. We are working with the health workers and burial teams on basic infection prevention and control measures. WHO is also supporting the decontamination of the mortuary at the local hospital, vehicles used in the transportation and the safe disposal of personal protection equipment”.
10. Close up, journalist
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Joel Millman, Spokesperson for the International Organisation for Migration (IOM): “IOM has agreed upon with its partner groups a standard shelter and kitchen set which will be distributed to all families whose homes are destroyed. We understand that is 1100 households, approximately 4 000 people”.

UNICEF - 15 AUGUST 2017, FREETOWN, SIERRA LEONE

12. Med shot, ambulance arriving
13. Wide shot, bulldozer digging
14. Med shot, people watching
15. Wide shot, rescue workers
16. Med shot, rescue worker passing by
17. Pan right, rescue workers carrying a bodybag
STORYLINE
Following the devastating floods and landslides on August 14 in Sierra Leone where more than 400 people were killed and several hundred are still missing, the government and the United Nations resident coordinator have asked now for international relief operations.

Today (18 Aug) the spokesperson for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Jens Laerke told reporters in Geneva that “the government and the resident coordinator of the UN also in the country, requested international support. That was on the 16th, so two days ago. Clearly, we have mobilised immediately, we from OCHA side are standing up, mounting a what we call an UNDAC mission, a UN Disaster and Assessment Coordination mission. It will be a total of seven people. They will begin to deploy today”.

Torrential rain triggered deadly mudslides that wiped out entire communities in the Racecourse, regent and Lumley areas of Freetown.

The UN Country Team and humanitarian partners in Sierra Leone continue to support relief operations, help evacuate residents, provide medical assistance to the injured, register survivors, assist in body management, and provide food rations, water, dignity kits and shelter materials to those affected.

UNICEF is providing emergency sanitation work such as safe drinking water and sanitation. At the two main sites of temporary displacement, UNICEF is setting up rainwater harvesting so that people are able to get water from the rains. Latrines are also being built.

Being at the peak of the rainy season, Malaria is also a potential threat for the children affected by the mudslides. Christophe Boulierac, Spokesperson for the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) said that “Malaria is also among the biggest killer of children under 5 and we are at the peak of the rainy season which is the annual high point for Malaria death. Malaria contributes to an estimate of 20 percent of child mortality in Sierra Leone and is the cause of nearly four in 10 hospital consultations countrywide”.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) is leading the health partners’ response in supporting national authorities to address health related issues emerging from the mudslide emergency.

Its spokesperson Christian Lindmeier said that “flooding creates breeding grounds for mosquitoes and can cause or most likely does cause an increase in Malaria and other vector borne diseases”.

He also added that “trauma is a major issue for those affected by the tragedy, hundreds of lives have been lost and many families displaced. Psychosocial support will be critical to help people manage to grieve and loss they suffered as a result”.

As burial of bodies has begun, WHO is also providing their expertise in the organisation. Lindmeier said that “we are helping to ensure that dead bodies are managed safely and with dignity in Sierra Leone while protecting the health of frontline health workers. We are working with the health workers and burial teams on basic infection prevention and control measures. WHO is also supporting the decontamination of the mortuary at the local hospital, vehicles used in the transportation and the safe disposal of personal protection equipment”.

Joel Millman from the International Organisation of Migration (IOM) informed that “a standard shelter and kitchen set will be distributed to all families whose homes are destroyed. We understand that is 1 100 households, approximately 4 000 people”.
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