UNDP / MOSUL WATER PLANT

07-Aug-2017 00:01:58
The West Mosul’s New Water Treatment Plant al-Ayman al-Jadeda, the largest water plant in Mosul is is about to become operational later this week, after an electric line was installed across the Tigris river from East Mosul to West Mosul a few days ago. UNDP
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DESCRIPTION
STORY: UNDP / MOSUL WATER PLANT
TRT: 1:58
SOURCE: UNDP
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 1 AUGUST 2017, MOSUL, IRAQ
SHOTLIST
1. Aerial shot, West Mosul water treatment plant intake building on the Tigris river
2. Tilt down, Iraqi worker pulling electric cable from a coil
3. Aerial shot, workers pulling cable across the river
4. Tracking shot, rope in water
5. Med shot, man tossing a rope from boat
6. Tracking shot, worker pulling a rope
7. Aeria shot, coil being transferred off a truck
8. Tracking shot, workers uncoiling electric cable
9. Pan left, workers uncoiling electric cable
10. SOUNDBITE (Arabic): Ahmad Amjad Mohammed Ali, Chief Engineer and Director of Central Nineveh Electricity Directorate:
“Thank God, we today are reaping the fruits of this effort by completing the crossing of the river, which is the hardest part of the project. Implementation only took 15 days, and today the entire project will be completed.”
12. Aerial shot, worker climbing electric tower
13. Aerial shot, worker on top of electric tower
14. Aerial shot, West Mosul water treatment plant intake building
STORYLINE
The West Mosul’s New Water Treatment Plant al-Ayman al-Jadeda, the largest water plant in Mosul is is about to become operational later this week, after an electric line was installed across the Tigris river from East Mosul to West Mosul a few days ago.

At full capacity, the plant provided water to about 500,000 people. Connecting the plant to a power source was a key step in restarting the facility and once all repair works are done, the plant will operate at around fifty percent capacity.

The water plant has not been functioning because the electricity grid in West Mosul was badly damaged in the operation to retake the city from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

As a quick-fix solution to provide power to the plant, the Ninewah Directorate of Electricity, with support from the United Nations Developing Fund (UNDP) agreed to string an electric cable from East Mosul, where the power grid is functioning, over the Tigris River to the water treatment plant.

After work building towers and pulling up electric lines on both sides of the Tigris was complete, the line was connected across the river. A small red boat motored back and forth for hours, ferrying rope and electric cables from one side to the other. A tractor and series of pulleys hoisted the cables into place. The line became operational later in the day.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic): Ahmad Amjad Mohammed Ali, Chief Engineer and Director of Central Nineveh Electricity Directorate:
“Thank God, we today are reaping the fruits of this effort by completing the crossing of the river, which is the hardest part of the project. Implementation only took 15 days, and today the entire project will be completed.”

UNDP will now focus supporting the Iraqi government's efforts to rehabilitate and activate all four water plants in western Mosul: getting the New Water Plant back up to full capacity with further rehabilitation; repairing the Danedan and Ghizlani plants in the southern part of the city, for about 100,000 beneficiaries; assessing the needs for the Old Water Treatment Plant (al-Ayman al-Qadeem) for about 400,000 beneficiaries; and constructing an electrical line connecting the New and Old plants to a permanent power source. Taken together, this will provide a constant source of safe water for the inhabitants of the West Mosul and support the safe return of displaced people.

During the conflict in Mosul, all of the bridges across the Tigris were damaged. The east part of the city was liberated six months before the west part and today the gulf between the two sides of the city is much wider than physical span of the river dividing it. The east has come back to life, and residents have returned. The west is still decimated. Connecting the electric line across the Tigris was a small step toward reconnecting a divided city.
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