YEMEN / CHILDREN WATER CHOLERA

14-Jul-2017 00:01:35
The health crisis in Yemen is a consequence of two years of heavy conflict. Collapsing health, water and sanitation systems have cut off 14.5 million people from regular access to clean water and sanitation, increasing the ability of diseases to spread, according to the UN Children's Fund. UNICEF
Size
Format
Acquire
228.14 MB
HD PAL
228.22 MB
HD NTSC
110.86 MB
SD PAL
DESCRIPTION
STORY: YEMEN / CHILDREN WATER CHOLERA
TRT: 1:35
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: CREDIT UNICEF FOOTAGE ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 02 JULY 2017, SANA’A, YEMEN
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, children scaling hill with water jugs
2. Wide shot, girl and boy carrying water jugs
3. Wide shot, garbage on side of road
4. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Ahmed Mohammed, Sana’a resident:
“We ask for medicine and water and food. Sometimes we sleep with nothing to eat. And if you search in the village you will not find even 2 kilos of flour at the houses. They have nothing.“
5. Wide shot, hospital corridor
6. Close up, baby receiving treatment
7. Close up, boy receiving treatment
8. Close up, baby crying while receiving treatment
9. Med shot, patients lining in hospital hallway
10. Wide shot, interior of hospital – patients lining hallway
11. Wide shot, health workers
12. Close up, baby receiving treatment
13. Wide shot, health workers posting notices
14. Med shot, health workers going door-to-door
15. Tilt up, exterior, village
16. Close up, boy smiling
17. Med shot, boy amid garbage and rubble
18. Wide shot, children walking amid garbage and rubble 
STORYLINE
In October 2016 cases of cholera in the city of Sana’a were announced by Yemeni health authorities. In April, this cholera outbreak began to spread rapidly and widely across Yemen.

Between 27 April and 12 July, 326,082 cases of acute watery diarrhoea/suspected were reported along with 1,743 associated deaths have been reported from 292 out of 333 districts.

Acute watery diarrhoea caused by cholera or other infections can result in severe dehydration which can rapidly result in death unless treated quickly and properly.

This health crisis is a consequence of two years of heavy conflict. Collapsing health, water and sanitation systems have cut off 14.5 million people from regular access to clean water and sanitation, increasing the ability of diseases to spread.

At the same time, there is a shortage of doctors and nursing staff to help treat and care for those affected. There are no longer any doctors present in 49 of the country’s 333 districts. Some have fled the country and those who have stayed have not been paid for more than ten months.

With Yemeni authorities WHO, UNICEF and other partners are racing to bring this outbreak under control. The UN agencies are working to detect and track the spread of the disease and reach people with medical treatment, safe water and adequate sanitation and hygiene practices.

WHO and UNICEF are supporting 626 diarrhoea treatment centres and oral rehydration therapy corners across the nation in the most affected districts, with a plan to further scale up to a total of 1156 such facilities. Since 27 April, WHO and UNICEF have provided more than 4 million sachets of oral rehydration solution, 828,000 bags of intravenous fluids, 1025 beds with cleaning supplies and 158 kits containing supplies for the treatment of cholera and diarrhoeal diseases.
Category
Geographic Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed170714e