WHO / WATER AND SANITATION

12-Jul-2017 00:02:30
A new report issued today by the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF said three out of ten people worldwide or 2.1 billion, lack access to safe, readily available water at home, and 6 in 10, or 4.5 billion, lack safely managed sanitation. WHO /FILE
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STORYLINE: WHO / WATER AND SANITATION
TRT: 2:30
SOURCE: WHO /FILE
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 11 JULY 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND /FILE
SHOTLIST
WHO - 12 JULY 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Gordon in meeting
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Bruce Gordon, Coordinator of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, WHO:
“About two billion people lack access to what we call a safely managed drinking water service. Now, that is an indicator for Sustainable Development Goals and the criteria by which the world's progress on water will be measured. We've never been before able to accurately measure through direct testing drinking water quality, now we are also looking at whether it's available at the home and whether it is available when needed.”
3. Close up, notebook
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Bruce Gordon, Coordinator of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, WHO:
“4.4 billion people in the world - or about 60% of the world - currently lack a toilet or a latrine that is connected to a system which allows further excreta to be disposed or treated safely so that it doesn't harm other communities.”
5. Wide shot, Gordon in meeting
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Bruce Gordon, Coordinator of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, WHO:
“Diarrhoeal disease undoubtedly causes the highest toll. 842,000 people die every year because of unsafe water, sanitation and hygiene. We get into explosive epidemics, for example one that's currently happening on cholera in the horn of Africa which is very concerning to WHO. In Yemen alone they’re approaching 300,000 cases of Cholera.”
7. Close up, notebook
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Bruce Gordon, Coordinator of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, WHO:
“When we look at basic access, when we look at things like open defecation which as an expression of inequality, almost 900 million people are openly defecating today, that is inexcusable and unacceptable in our time. So we've got to attack that. We've also got to push for higher levels of service for those that are fortunate enough to have for example the basics. So what that means is more investment, it means more efficient and targeted spending, it means higher political prioritisation and really kind of having better governance."

FILE – UNIFEED - 27 MAY 2017, MAIDUGURI, NIGERIA

9. Various shots, women and children at water point in displaced camps

STORYLINE:

A new report issued today by the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF said three out of ten people worldwide or 2.1 billion, lack access to safe, readily available water at home, and 6 in 10, or 4.5 billion, lack safely managed sanitation.

The Joint Monitoring Programme report, Progress on Drinking Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: 2017 Update and Sustainable Development Goal Baselines, presents the first global assessment of “safely managed” drinking water and sanitation services. The overriding conclusion is that too many people still lack access, particularly in rural areas.

Dr Bruce Gordon, Coordinator of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene at the WHO said that 2.1 billion people without access to safe drinking water is “an indicator for Sustainable Development Goals and the criteria by which the world's progress on water will be measured.”

He also said “we've never been before able to accurately measure through direct testing drinking water quality, now we are also looking at whether it's available at the home and whether it is available when needed.”

Billions of people have gained access to basic drinking water and sanitation services since 2000, but these services do not necessarily provide safe water and sanitation. Many homes, healthcare facilities and schools also still lack soap and water for handwashing. This puts the health of all people – but especially young children – at risk for diseases, such as diarrhoea.

As a result, every year, 361 000 children under 5 years die due to diarrhoea. Poor sanitation and contaminated water are also linked to transmission of diseases such as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis A, and typhoid.

Gordon said “when we look at basic access, when we look at things like open defecation which as an expression of inequality, almost 900 million people are openly defecating today, that is inexcusable and unacceptable in our time. So we've got to attack that. We've also got to push for higher levels of service for those that are fortunate enough to have for example the basics. So what that means is more investment, it means more efficient and targeted spending, it means higher political prioritisation and really kind of having better governance."

In order to decrease global inequalities, the new SDGs call for ending open defecation and achieving universal access to basic services by 2030.

Of the 2.1 billion people who do not have safely managed water, 844 million do not have even a basic drinking water service. This includes 263 million people who have to spend over 30 minutes per trip collecting water from sources outside the home, and 159 million who still drink untreated water from surface water sources, such as streams or lakes.

In 90 countries, progress towards basic sanitation is too slow, meaning they will not reach universal coverage by 2030.

Of the 4.5 billion people who do not have safely managed sanitation, 2.3 billion still do not have basic sanitation services. This includes 600 million people who share a toilet or latrine with other households, and 892 million people – mostly in rural areas – who defecate in the open. Due to population growth, open defecation is increasing in sub-Saharan Africa and Oceania.

Good hygiene is one of the simplest and most effective ways to prevent the spread of disease. For the first time, the SDGs are monitoring the percentage of people who have facilities to wash their hands at home with soap and water. According to the new report, access to water and soap for
STORYLINE
WHO / WATER AND SANITATION
TRT: 2:30
SOURCE: WHO /FILE
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 11 JULY 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND /FILE

SHOTLIST:

WHO - 12 JULY 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Gordon in meeting
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Bruce Gordon, Coordinator of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, WHO:
“About two billion people lack access to what we call a safely managed drinking water service. Now, that is an indicator for Sustainable Development Goals and the criteria by which the world's progress on water will be measured. We've never been before able to accurately measure through direct testing drinking water quality, now we are also looking at whether it's available at the home and whether it is available when needed.”
3. Close up, notebook
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Bruce Gordon, Coordinator of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, WHO:
“4.4 billion people in the world - or about 60% of the world - currently lack a toilet or a latrine that is connected to a system which allows further excreta to be disposed or treated safely so that it doesn't harm other communities.”
5. Wide shot, Gordon in meeting
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Bruce Gordon, Coordinator of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, WHO:
“Diarrhoeal disease undoubtedly causes the highest toll. 842,000 people die every year because of unsafe water, sanitation and hygiene. We get into explosive epidemics, for example one that's currently happening on cholera in the horn of Africa which is very concerning to WHO. In Yemen alone they’re approaching 300,000 cases of Cholera.”
7. Close up, notebook
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Bruce Gordon, Coordinator of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, WHO:
“When we look at basic access, when we look at things like open defecation which as an expression of inequality, almost 900 million people are openly defecating today, that is inexcusable and unacceptable in our time. So we've got to attack that. We've also got to push for higher levels of service for those that are fortunate enough to have for example the basics. So what that means is more investment, it means more efficient and targeted spending, it means higher political prioritisation and really kind of having better governance."

FILE – UNIFEED - 27 MAY 2017, MAIDUGURI, NIGERIA

9. Various shots, women and children at water point in displaced camps

STORYLINE:

A new report issued today by the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF said three out of ten people worldwide or 2.1 billion, lack access to safe, readily available water at home, and 6 in 10, or 4.5 billion, lack safely managed sanitation.

The Joint Monitoring Programme report, Progress on Drinking Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: 2017 Update and Sustainable Development Goal Baselines, presents the first global assessment of “safely managed” drinking water and sanitation services. The overriding conclusion is that too many people still lack access, particularly in rural areas.

Dr Bruce Gordon, Coordinator of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene at the WHO said that 2.1 billion people without access to safe drinking water is “an indicator for Sustainable Development Goals and the criteria by which the world's progress on water will be measured.”

He also said “we've never been before able to accurately measure through direct testing drinking water quality, now we are also looking at whether it's available at the home and whether it is available when needed.”

Billions of people have gained access to basic drinking water and sanitation services since 2000, but these services do not necessarily provide safe water and sanitation. Many homes, healthcare facilities and schools also still lack soap and water for handwashing. This puts the health of all people – but especially young children – at risk for diseases, such as diarrhoea.

As a result, every year, 361 000 children under 5 years die due to diarrhoea. Poor sanitation and contaminated water are also linked to transmission of diseases such as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis A, and typhoid.

Gordon said “when we look at basic access, when we look at things like open defecation which as an expression of inequality, almost 900 million people are openly defecating today, that is inexcusable and unacceptable in our time. So we've got to attack that. We've also got to push for higher levels of service for those that are fortunate enough to have for example the basics. So what that means is more investment, it means more efficient and targeted spending, it means higher political prioritisation and really kind of having better governance."

In order to decrease global inequalities, the new SDGs call for ending open defecation and achieving universal access to basic services by 2030.

Of the 2.1 billion people who do not have safely managed water, 844 million do not have even a basic drinking water service. This includes 263 million people who have to spend over 30 minutes per trip collecting water from sources outside the home, and 159 million who still drink untreated water from surface water sources, such as streams or lakes.

In 90 countries, progress towards basic sanitation is too slow, meaning they will not reach universal coverage by 2030.

Of the 4.5 billion people who do not have safely managed sanitation, 2.3 billion still do not have basic sanitation services. This includes 600 million people who share a toilet or latrine with other households, and 892 million people – mostly in rural areas – who defecate in the open. Due to population growth, open defecation is increasing in sub-Saharan Africa and Oceania.

Good hygiene is one of the simplest and most effective ways to prevent the spread of disease. For the first time, the SDGs are monitoring the percentage of people who have facilities to wash their hands at home with soap and water. According to the new report, access to water and soap for handwashing varies immensely in the 70 countries with available data, from 15 per cent of the population in sub-Saharan Africa to 76 per cent in western Asia and northern Africa.
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