WHO / WORLD HEALTH STATISTICS

17-May-2017 00:02:53
Almost half of all deaths globally are now recorded with a cause, new data from the World Health Organization show, highlighting improvements countries have made on collecting vital statistics and monitoring progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). WHO
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STORY: WHO / WORLD HEALTH STATISTICS
TRT: 2:53
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 16 MAY 2017, GENEVA SWITZERLAND / RECENT
SHOTLIST
RECENT - GENEVA

1. Wide shot, exterior WHO headquarters

16 MAY 2017, GENEVA

2. Wide shot, Dr. Stevens and interviewer in corridor reading report
3. Close up, report cover
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Gretchen Stevens, Technical Officer, Department of Information, Evidence and Research, World Health Organization (WHO):
“There are three key messages from the World Health Statistics. The first one is about monitoring health. Of course we need to have data collection in order to know what is going on with health, and we found that more than half of deaths in the world are not recorded with information on cause of death.”
5. Tilt up, from report to Dr. Stevens speaking
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Gretchen Stevens, Technical Officer, Department of Information, Evidence and Research, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Right now in the world, more than half of deaths are not recorded with the cause of death, that sounds terrible, but that is actually a big improvement from 10 years ago when it was only a third a deaths that were recorded with cause of death.”
7. Close up, report
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Gretchen Stevens, Technical Officer, Department of Information, Evidence and Research, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Our second key finding is that overall health is getting better in the world. In the last 15 years life expectancy has increased by about five years and that increase has been greater in sub-Saharan Africa, which is the area with the lowest overall life expectancy. And our third key message is about universal health coverage. Universal health coverage is the cornerstone of the method towards improving health, and we are monitoring the two main dimensions of UHC, universal health coverage, one is coverage of health services and we have found that it is improving in the world. And the other is financial protection and we found that in data from 117 countries, about 9.3 percent of people are still spending more than 10 percent of their household budget accessing care and that is a problem that needs to be addressed.”
9. Wide shot, Dr. Stevens and interviewer in corridor reading report
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Gretchen Stevens, Technical Officer, Department of Information, Evidence and Research, World Health Organization (WHO):
“In order to record deaths with accurate cause of death information, there are two main things that need to be in place, first there needs to be bureaucratic systems in place and those take years to build up and so it is a major investment and it takes quite a bit of political will to put death registration into practice. The second thing that needs to be in place is there needs to be a medical doctors to identify the cause of death and when there are insufficient medical personnel it is not possible to record a cause of death.”
11. Close up, Dr. Stevens
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Gretchen Stevens, Technical Officer, Department of Information, Evidence and Research, World Health Organization (WHO):
“So the impact is that in the areas where mortality rates are the highest we have the most uncertainty of what people are dying from and this has major implications, so for example one of the leading causes of death for children under five is pneumonia, there is quite a bit of uncertainty about which bugs are actually killing the children, if there was sufficient medical infrastructure in place to do diagnosis and record this information then we wouldn’t have so much uncertainty and we would have much easier time targeting our interventions.”
13. Wide shot, Dr. Stevens and interviewer in corridor reading report
STORYLINE
Almost half of all deaths globally are now recorded with a cause, new data from the World Health Organization show, highlighting improvements countries have made on collecting vital statistics and monitoring progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Of the estimated 56 million deaths globally in 2015, 27 million were registered with a cause of death, according to WHO’s annual World Health Statistics. In 2005, only about a third of deaths had a recorded cause. Several countries have made significant strides towards strengthening the data they collect, including China, Turkey and the Islamic Republic of Iran, where 90 percent of deaths are now recorded with detailed cause-of-death information, compared with 5 percent in 1999.

Incomplete or incorrect information on those deaths that are registered also reduce the usefulness of those data for tracking public health trends, planning measures to improve health, and evaluating whether policies are working.

The World Health Statistics, one of WHO’s annual flagship publications, compiles data from the organization’s 194 Member States on 21 health-related SDG targets, providing a snapshot of both gains and threats to the health of the world’s people. While the quality of health data has improved significantly in recent years, many countries still do not routinely collect high-quality data to monitor health-related SDG indicators.

The report includes new data on progress towards universal health coverage. Those data show that globally, ten measures of essential health service coverage have improved since 2000. Coverage of treatment for HIV and bed nets to prevent malaria have increased the most, from very low levels in 2000. Steady increases have also been seen in access to antenatal care and improved sanitation, while gains in routine child immunization coverage from 2000 to 2010 slowed somewhat between 2010 and 2015.

Access to services is just one dimension of universal health coverage; how much people pay out of their own pockets for those services is the other. The most recent data from 117 countries show that an average of 9.3 percent of people in each country spend more than 10 percent of their household budget on health care, a level of spending that is likely to expose a household to financial hardship.
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