UN / SOMALIA

17-May-2017 00:01:50
The UN deputy representative for Somalia, Raisedon Zenenga, said “the tragedy emanating from the severe drought continues to unfold” in the country as the resulting humanitarian crisis “has deteriorated more rapidly than was originally projected.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / SOMALIA
TRT: 01:50
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 17 MAY 2017, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

17 MAY 2017, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Raisedon Zenenga, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-
General for Somalia, United Nations:
“The tragedy emanating from the severe drought continues to unfold. The humanitarian crisis has deteriorated more rapidly than was originally projected.”
4. Med shot, delegates
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Raisedon Zenenga, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-
General for Somalia, United Nations:
“Steps must be taken to build Somalia's capacity to withstand recurrent humanitarian crises triggered by extreme climatic conditions. Somalia will continue to lurch from one avoidable humanitarian crisis to another, unless resilience is fostered by addressing the country's structural problems.”
6. Med shot, delegates
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Raisedon Zenenga, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-
General for Somalia, United Nations:
“Al Shabaab feeds on the existing shortfalls in governance, particularly in the areas of human rights, justice and the rule of law, and the delivery of basic services. An inclusive approach to governance and access to basic services is therefore critical to preventing and countering violent extremism.”
8. Med shot, delegates
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Raisedon Zenenga, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-
General for Somalia, United Nations:
“We must acknowledge that the absence of an agreed National Security Architecture and the disorganized delivery of security sector support by international partners over the past eight years have contributed, in equal measure, to the lack of progress in building capable and legitimate security forces in Somalia.”
10. Wide shot, Security Council
STORYLINE
The UN deputy representative for Somalia, Raisedon Zenenga, said “the tragedy emanating from the severe drought continues to unfold” in the country as the resulting humanitarian crisis “has deteriorated more rapidly than was originally projected.”

Addressing the Security Council today (17 May) via teleconference from Mogadishu, Zenenga said the scaled up response by humanitarian agencies has so far averted a famine but the crisis was unlikely to abate any time soon. He stressed that the needs for humanitarian assistance were increasing faster than the pace of the response with only half of the three million people in need of food being reached. He said Somalia’s capacity to deal with “recurrent humanitarian crises triggered by extreme climatic conditions” must be built, adding that the country would “continue to lurch from one avoidable humanitarian crisis to another, unless resilience is fostered by addressing the country's structural problems.”

Zenenga praised the agreement reach last month on a National Security Architecture which provides the framework for the accelerated development of acceptable, accountable, affordable and able security forces. He said the agreement would have a catalytic effect on efforts to reinforce governance and provides a model for other essential political agreements on such key issues as the management of natural resources, revenue-sharing, and the broader definition of the respective powers and responsibilities of the Federal Government and the Federal Member States.

Zenenga also applauded the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) for providing the backbone of security in the country over the past 10 year and in facing the continued insecurity, particularly from Al Shabab. He said the fight against the terrorist organization must be conducted in a manner which complies with international human rights and humanitarian law as it “feeds on the existing shortfalls in governance, particularly in the areas of human rights, justice and the rule of law, and the delivery of basic services.” He said “an inclusive approach to governance and access to basic services is therefore critical to preventing and countering violent extremism.”

Zenenga noted that support to AMISOM to carry out effective operations must accompany and complement implementation of the National Security Architecture agreement. He said the target dates set out in the agreement would not be met without substantial and coherent support from international partners adding that the work related to the agreement must be harmonized with arrangements for the conditions-based transition of primary responsibility for the country's security from AMISOM to Somalia's security forces, which is expected to start in 2018. Zenenga emphasized that such cohesion was imperative, not just among the relevant Somali institutions, but also among the many international partners that deliver support to Somalia's security sector and to key political processes. He said, “We must acknowledge that the absence of an agreed National Security Architecture and the disorganized delivery of security sector support by international partners over the past eight years have contributed, in equal measure, to the lack of progress in building capable and legitimate security forces in Somalia.”
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