UN / MOSUL

16-Mar-2017 00:02:12
The United Nations humanitarian chief in Iraq said the number and pace of the people fleeing fighting in western Mosul was higher than during the battle for the eastern part of the city, adding that it was not clear whether humanitarians had the resources to respond to “what is increasingly looking like a mass exodus.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / MOSUL
TRT: 02:12
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 16 MARCH 2017, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UNHQ exterior

16 MARCH 2017, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Lise Grande, Resident Coordinator and Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, United Nations:
“First, the number of people that are coming out and the pace of the exodus is higher than it was in the east. And number two, it is still not clear that on the humanitarian side we have the resources we need in order to be able to respond for what is increasingly looking like a mass exodus.”
4. Med shot, journalist asking question
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Lise Grande, Resident Coordinator and Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, United Nations:
“Many of the families that we are seeing now are coming out because they haven’t had sufficient food. We interviewed families who are down to one meal a day and have been there for a number on weeks. And there are also very sad stories of families who are having to skip meals over several days because they just haven’t had the money they need in order to buy food and because the food stocks in western Mosul are extremely limited.”
6. Med shot, journalist asking question
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Lise Grande, Resident Coordinator and Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, United Nations:
“One of the things that was so impressive about what happened in eastern Mosul was the very limited use of artillery. What appears to be happening in western Mosul; and I have to say appears because we are not actually on the ground, so these are the reports we receive from the families that are displaced, but one of the things they are saying is that there appears to be much more destruction which would imply a heavier use of artillery.”
8. Med shot, journalist asking question
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Lise Grande, Resident Coordinator and Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, United Nations:
“Right now, today we have space for 24,000 people, 6,800 came out today. Tomorrow, if 20,000 people come out, there is our capacity. Now we’re building every day. I mean, I’m not kidding you, every day more plots are coming online. But you know, if we were to see 20,000 out tomorrow that’s our limit; that’s our capacity and we would be putting people in the rub halls that I was just describing.”
10. Wide shot, press room
STORYLINE
The United Nations humanitarian chief in Iraq said the number and pace of the people fleeing fighting in western Mosul was higher than during the battle for the eastern part of the city adding that it was not clear whether humanitarians had the resources to respond to “what is increasingly looking like a mass exodus.”

Speaking to reporters today (16 Mar) via teleconference from Iraq, Lise Grande estimated that between 650,000 and 680,000 civilians were still in the western part of Mosul with some 400,000 in the old city, which is seeing the heaviest fighting in the offensive by Iraqi forces to re-take the city from ISIL. She feared civilians may become trapped if the old city came under a prolonged siege as many neighbourhoods were already receiving intermittent, if any, water resources. She reported that many of the families fled because they did not have sufficient food with some families “having to skip meals over several days.” Grande stressed that civilians were equally at risk whether they decided to stay or leave as ISIL fighters were deliberately targeting civilians fleeing the battle.

Grande said the UN was scrambling to get sites ready to received people displaced by the violence which was now averaging about 45,000 a week. Grande said one of the things that was “so impressive about what happened in eastern Mosul was the very limited use of artillery.” She said according to reports from families fleeing western Mosul “there appears to be much more destruction which would imply a heavier use of artillery.” Grande pointed to the fact that many families remained in eastern Mosul because the Iraqi military had a “humanitarian concept of operations” and called on the government forces to maintain this concept in the fight to re-take the western part of the city.
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