ILO / TELEWORKING REPORT

15-Feb-2017 00:02:04
The International Labour Organization (ILO) released a new report on teleworking that explores how the expanding use of digital technologies is rapidly transforming the traditional model of work. ILO TV
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STORY: ILO / TELEWORKING REPORT
TRT: 2:04
SOURCE: ILO TV
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE

DATELINE: 15 FEBRUARY 2017, PALAIS DES NATIONS, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1 Wide shot, presser
2. Close up, ILO report
3. Med shot, reporters
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Jon Messenger, co-author, “Working Anytime, Anywhere” report, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“This is about new information and communications technologies so-called new ICTs and I think we all know that they've revolutionized everyday working life in the 21st century. Probably all of you have one of these in your pocket. And if so you are undoubtedly working any time anywhere.”
5. Wide shot, presser
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Jon Messenger, co-author, “Working Anytime, Anywhere” report, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“The key messages are that this form of work is expanding due to the constant connectivity that's enabled by new information and communications technologies. And the effects that we see are both positive and negative. For example better overall work life balance, however a blurring of the boundaries between paid work and personal life and that can have negative consequences as well. Therefore what we need to do is to shape technology so that we can create a future of work that's positive and build a better society.”
7. Med shot, journalist and photographer
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Oscar Varges, co-author of the report for Eurofound:
“These can pose risks for the health of workers when workers do it in a very regular basis. So I think we have to look after this issue not only in terms of working time or pay but also in terms of occupational health and safety. And this is where it comes to the difficulty because it's very difficult to manage OSH issues outside the work place. Nevertheless as we say in the report, the important thing is that working with ICTs outside the employer's premises is shaped somehow by policymakers so that we can prefer prevent this type of negative effects.”
9. Close up, ILO report
STORYLINE
The International Labour Organization (ILO) released a new report on teleworking that explores how the expanding use of digital technologies is rapidly transforming the traditional model of work.

The report “Working anytime, anywhere: The effects on the world of work” pulls together research carried about by both ILO and Eurofound in 15 different countries, including ten EU Member States (Belgium, France, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom) as well as Argentina, Brazil, India, Japan and the United States.

Speaking to reporters in Geneva today (15 Feb) in Geneva, co-author of the report Jon Messenger said “this is about new information and communications technologies so-called new ICTs and I think we all know that they've revolutionized everyday working life in the 21st century. Probably all of you have one of these in your pocket. And if so you are undoubtedly working any time anywhere.”

The report looks into how teleworking can be beneficial as well as detrimental for both employees and employers.

Messenger noted the key messages were that this form of work was expanding due to the constant connectivity that's enabled by new information and communications technologies.

He added “the effects that we see are both positive and negative. For example better overall work life balance, however a blurring of the boundaries between paid work and personal life and that can have negative consequences as well. Therefore what we need to do is to shape technology so that we can create a future of work that's positive and build a better society.”

Also speaking in Geneva, co-author of the report for Eurofound Oscar Varges pointed out that some workers work the regular working hours at the office, but then when they finish work they can work from all the places -including their homes-, and that is what they call supplemental working time.

He also said “this can pose risks for the health of workers when workers do it in a very regular basis. So I think we have to look after this issue not only in terms of working time or pay but also in terms of occupational health and safety (OSH). And this is where it comes to the difficulty because it's very difficult to manage OSH issues outside the work place.”

He added, “ Nevertheless as we say in the report, the important thing is that working with ICTs outside the employer's premises is shaped somehow by policymakers so that we can prefer prevent this type of negative effects.”

According to the report, there are distinctions between home-based teleworkers who seem to enjoy better work-life balance and 'high-mobile' workers who are more at risk of negative health and well-being outcomes.

The report recommends promoting formal part-time teleworking so that people working from home can maintain their ties with co-workers and improve their well-being.
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