GENEVA / UKRAINE HRC

29-Jun-2016 00:02:37
A top UN Human Rights official said in Geneva the situation in Ukraine “remains volatile.” and that the conflict "could escalate, with dire consequences for civilians and broader ramifications for the region."UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / UKRAINE HRC
TRT: 02.37
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 29 JUNE 2016, GENEVA / RECENT
SHOTLIST
RECENT - GENEVA

1. Exterior, Palais des Nations

29 JUNE 2016, GENEVA-

2. Wide shot, delegates
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Ivan Šimonović, Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, United Nations:
“The situation in Ukraine remains volatile and could develop along three scenarios. The conflict could escalate, with dire consequences for civilians and broader ramifications for the region; it could become a ‘frozen conflict’, creating a protracted environment of insecurity and instability; or move towards sustainable peace. The last scenario is the only favorable one, so how to get there?”
4. Close up, delegates
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ivan Šimonović, Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, United Nations:
“This crisis started with demands for human rights and freedoms, and these demands remain today on either side of the contact line.”
6. Med shot, delegates
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Ivan Šimonović, Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, United Nations:
“Fundamental freedoms are severely limited for 2.7 million people living in armed group-controlled areas. Limits of their freedom of expression, peaceful assembly, and association as well as lack of any space for dissenting views casts doubt on the prospects of holding free and fair elections in these areas until the situation improves. Only respect for civil and political rights brings them closer to the elections whose results can be recognized. But in government controlled areas, I also heard complaints about the curbing of civil and political rights, especially in the conflict zone. Of course the situation there is challenging but I am calling on the government to uphold human rights and think about the future that Ukrainians want for their country.”
8. Med shot, delegates
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Ivan Šimonović, Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, United Nations:
“On both sides of the contact line, leaders should listen to their people. I have heard them loud and clear: they want peace, human rights and the rule of law. OHCHR remains committed to assist Ukraine in this regard. In addition to monitoring and reporting on the situation of human rights in Ukraine, OHCHR will also step up its support to the Government of Ukraine through provision of legal expertise and technical assistance, especially in implementation of the National Human Rights Strategy and Action Plan.”
10. Close up, Ukraine delegate
11. Close up, Russia delegate
12. Wide shot, delegates
STORYLINE
A top UN Human Rights official said in Geneva the situation in Ukraine “remains volatile.”

Speaking today (29 Jun) at the Human Rights Council, Ivan Šimonović, United Nations Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, said “the current volatile situation in Ukraine could develop along three scenarios: The conflict could escalate, with dire consequences for civilians and broader ramifications for the region; it could become a ‘frozen conflict’, creating a protracted environment of insecurity and instability; or move towards sustainable peace. The last scenario is the only favourable one, so how to get there?”

He spoke about the latest Ukraine’s human rights situation report that covered the period from 16th February to 15th May 2016.

Šimonović stressed “this crisis started with demands for human rights and freedoms, and these demands remain today on either side of the contact line.”

He also noted that fundamental freedoms were “severely limited” for 2.7 million people living in armed group-controlled areas. He added that limits of their freedom of expression, peaceful assembly, and association as well as lack of any space for dissenting views casted doubt on the prospects of holding free and fair elections in these areas until the situation improves. He said “only respect for civil and political rights brings them closer to the elections whose results can be recognized.”

He added “but in government controlled areas, I also heard complaints about the curbing of civil and political rights, especially in the conflict zone. Of course the situation there is challenging but I am calling on the government to uphold human rights and think about the future that Ukrainians want for their country.”

He called for leaders on both sides of the conflict to listen to the people, saying “I have heard them loud and clear: they want peace, human rights and the rule of law.”

Šimonović pointed out that OHCHR remained committed to assist Ukraine in that regard. He also said “in addition to monitoring and reporting on the situation of human rights in Ukraine, OHCHR will also step up its support to the Government of Ukraine through provision of legal expertise and technical assistance, especially in implementation of the National Human Rights Strategy and Action Plan.”
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