WORLD BANK / JIM YONG KIM

14-Apr-2016 00:02:26
The weakening global economy threatens our progress toward ending extreme povertyin 2030, especially when combined with major global challenges such as forced displacement, climate change, and pandemics, according to World Bank President Jim Yong Kim. Speaking at the start of the World Bank-IMF Spring Meetings in Washington DC, Kim said the demand for services has never been higher outside of a crisis period. WORLD BANK
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: WORLD BANK / JIM YONG KIM
TRT: 02:26
SOURCE: WORLD BANK
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 14 APRIL 2016, WASHINGTON DC
SHOTLIST
14 APRIL 2016, WASHINGTON DC

1. Pan left, Jim Yong Kim walking across the stage
2. Wide shot, Jim Yong Kim walking across the stage and sitting down
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Jim Yong Kim, President, World Bank Group:
“The weakening global economy threatens our progress toward ending extreme poverty by 2030. In the global economy, there are not many bright spots around the world -- the United States is one among the developed countries and India is another among the middle-income countries. Growth remains weak in Europe and Japan, and among emerging economies, Russia and Brazil are projected to post again negative growth. We have just downgraded our global growth economic forecast this year from 2.9 percent to 2.5 percent. In this period of global economic slowdown, we’re also facing major global challenges -- forced displacement, climate change, and pandemics. And I want to stress, that each of these three represent very clear downside risks to the global economy.”
4. Med shot, journalists listening to speech
5. Wide shot, photographers taking photographs of Jim Yong Kim
6. Med shot, journalists taking notes
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Jim Yong Kim, President, World Bank Group:
“Also, because of the weak global economy, and because of global challenges, the demand for our services has never been higher outside of a crisis period. We project that we’ll provide more than $25 billion in loans this year to middle-income countries – that’s $10 billion more than we had projected. Including this year’s projections, World Bank lending will top $150 billion dollars in the last four years – more than any other four-year span in the World Bank’s history in a non-crisis period. This increased demand underscores the importance for donor countries to support our replenishment this year for the International Development Association, or IDA, which gives low-cost loans or grants to the poorest countries.”
8. Wide shot, Jim Yong Kim addressing audience
9. Close up, journalist typing on computer
10. Various shots, Jim Yong Kim addressing audience
11. Med shot, photographer taking photographs
12. Pan left, camera crews to Jim Yong Kim
14. Med shot, audience listening
STORYLINE
World Bank President Jim Yong Kim warned that weakening economies around the world were endangering efforts to combat extreme poverty, especially when combined with global challenges such as forced displacement and climate change. Kim spoke at the opening of World Bank-IMF Spring meetings in Washington DC.

Kim said the weakening global economy threatened progress toward ending extreme poverty by 2030. He said, “In the global economy, there are not many bright spots around the world -- the United States is one among the developed countries and India is another among the middle-income countries.” However, he added, “growth remains weak in Europe and Japan, and among emerging economies, Russia and Brazil are projected to post again negative growth.”

Kim said the World Bank had downgraded its global growth economic forecast this year from 2.9 percent to 2.5 percent. HE said, “In this period of global economic slowdown, we’re also facing major global challenges -- forced displacement, climate change, and pandemics.” He stressed that each of these three represent very clear downside risks to the global economy.

Kim noted that the demand for the World Bank’s services “has never been higher outside of a crisis period” due to the weak global economy and global challenges. He said, “We project that we’ll provide more than $25 billion in loans this year to middle-income countries – that’s $10 billion more than we had projected. Including this year’s projections, World Bank lending will top $150 billion dollars in the last four years – more than any other four-year span in the World Bank’s history in a non-crisis period.”
The World Bank President said this increased demand underscores the importance for donor countries to support replenishment this year for the International Development Association (IDA) which gives low-cost loans or grants to the poorest countries.
Category
Personal Subjects
Corporate Subjects
Alternate Title
unifeed160414f