UNICEF / MALI EDUCATION

17-Dec-2015 00:01:26
More than 380,000 children aged 7 to 15 remain out of school in insecure regions in northern Mali, three months into the new school year and almost four years since the security situation worsened in that part of the country, UNICEF said on Thursday. UNICEF/FILE
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STORY: UNICEF / MALI EDUCATION
TRT: 1:26
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: NATS
DATELINE: FILE – KIDAL, MALI
SHOTLIST
FILE – 2014, KIDAL, MALI

1. Close-up, peacekeeper from the back pointing his weapon
2. Wide shot, helicopters on the ground
3. Wide shot, helicopters landing

FILE – 19 NOVEMBER 2015, KIDAL, MALI

4. Close-up, bullet holes in the wall of the school
5. Wide shot, entrance of Baye Ag Mahaha school
6. Med shot, children with UNICEF bags going through the wall that has been destroyed by a car bomb
7. Med shot, children in the courtyard of Baye Ag Mahaha school
8. Wide shot, children running in the courtyard
9. Wide shot, young children sitting next to each other
10. Close-up, a girl on a bench in a classroom
11. Wide shot, children in the classroom
12. Wide shot, many boys in the classroom
13. Close-up, hands of a child reading a notebook
14. Close-up, a girl writing on the blackboard from the side
STORYLINE
More than 380,000 children aged 7 to 15 remain out of school in insecure regions in northern Mali, three months into the new school year and almost four years since the security situation worsened in that part of the country, UNICEF said on Thursday.

“Children in northern Mali know too well the impact of conflict, poverty and deprivation,” said Fran Equiza, UNICEF Representative in Mali. “Education is their best hope for the future.”

Over 280 schools, or 1 in 6, in the conflict-affected areas in northern Mali are closed, many of them for the third year in a row, after they were damaged, destroyed, looted or occupied by the warring parties. In Kidal, one of the worst hit areas, 79 per cent of schools remain closed. The journey to and from school remains unsafe, and fear of unexploded mines and other remnants of war have forced parents to keep their children away from the classrooms.

Violence has also led to a shortage of teachers. Nearly 600 teachers have fled the conflict areas or are no longer reporting to work because of insecurity.
UNICEF is helping to give children back their right to education, through a two-year campaign focusing on the areas of Gao, Kidal, Mopti, Segou and Timbuktu. The campaign, ‘Every Child Counts’, provides:

Training opportunities and learning materials for 2,000 teachers; Individual kits for students and school kits to reach 100,000 children; Peacebuilding activities for100,000 children and 10,000 booklets promoting peace and non-discrimination for students and their communities.

The campaign will also provide alternative and accelerated learning programmes, including via radio lessons, for out-of-school children. Schools will be rehabilitated and children will be educated about the danger of unexploded ordnance.

Up to 1.9 million children – or more than 1 in 5 – are affected by the crisis in Mali. More than 60,000 people are internally displaced and another 139,000 have sought refuge in neighbouring countries.

Despite the immense needs, UNICEF’s programmes in the country are hindered by constrained access and limited funding. The children’s agency has received less than a third of the $37 million it needs for its education, protection, health, nutrition and water, sanitation and hygiene programmes.

“The dream of building a better future for Mali’s children depends on action now,” Equiza said. “Better humanitarian access and more resources can’t come soon enough for those who have been deprived for so long. Education is their best hope for the future.”
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