UN / AFGHANISTAN OPIUM REPORT

14-Oct-2015 00:02:25
Opium poppy cultivation in Afghanistan has decreased 19 per cent in 2015, compared to the previous year, according to the latest Afghanistan Opium Survey figures released by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. UNIFEED-UNTV
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: UN / AFGHANISTAN OPIUM REPORT
TRT: 02:25
SOURCE: UNIFEED-UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 14 OCTOBER 2015, NEW YORK CITY / RECENT
SHOTLIST
RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Aerial shot, exterior United Nations Headquarters

14 OCTOBER 2015, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Afghanistan Opium Survey presentation in progress
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Simone Monasebian, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Director:
“The positive results of this survey offer us, the Afghan government and the international community the momentum to strengthen our resolve and to solidify what gains have been made.”
4. Wide shot, Afghanistan Opium Survey presentation in progress
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Simone Monasebian, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Director:
“It is critical that the Afghan authorities and the international community continue to work together to address the priority and challenges that the government itself has identified. These include the need for effective measures to counter the narcotics trade that it’s undermining the country’s development and fuelling terrorism.”
6. Wide shot, Afghanistan Opium Survey presentation in progress
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Angela Me, Chief of United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) Statistics and Surveys Section:
“We have done other research and consulted with other researchers in Afghanistan and we really see that, we can really confirm that there was a decrease. Probably the decrease was not as big as we are reporting here particularly for Kandahar where I showed you earlier, you will see a decrease in the estimates of almost 40%. Actually that’s where it is not as big as we have in the new estimate but definitely there was still a decrease. So the trend, I think we can comfortably say with precision that there was a change.”
8. Wide shot, Afghanistan Opium Survey presentation in progress
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Zahir Tanin, Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations:
“We have a very strong mandate from the people of Afghanistan to eradicate, to fight narcotics. The message has been very strong and very direct and this is why the political will within the government is at the heist at the moment. This is why the figures associated with drug production and trafficking will not be tolerated within the government of Afghanistan.”
10. Wide shot, Afghanistan Opium Survey presentation in progress
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Zahir Tanin, Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations:
“So if we do get a chance to have peace we do have the tools to fight and to introduce alternative livelihood. Where we don’t it doesn’t matter how successful how alternative livelihood is, nothing is working.”
12. Wide shot, closing of presentation
STORYLINE
Opium poppy cultivation in Afghanistan decreased 19 per cent in 2015, compared to the previous year, according to the latest Afghanistan Opium Survey figures released today (14 October) by the Afghan Ministry of Counter Narcotics and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

The findings show that the area under opium poppy cultivation in 2015 is around 183,000 hectares compared with 224,000 hectares in 2014, while the cultivation area has decreased for the first time since 2009.

During a presentation of the survey findings at the UN Headquarters in New York, UNODC Director, Simone Monasebian, said “the positive results of this survey offer us, the Afghan government and the international community, the momentum to strengthen our resolve and to solidify what gains have been made.”

“It is critical that the Afghan authorities and the international community continue to work together to address the priority and challenges that the government itself has identified. These include the need for effective measures to counter the narcotics trade that it’s undermining the country’s development and fuelling terrorism,” Monasebian added.

The survey further notes that in 2015, potential opium production in Afghanistan amounts to 3,300 tons, a decrease of 48 per cent from its 2014 level (6,400 tons). The average opium yield meanwhile is at 18.3 kilograms per hectare. Despite these noted decreases, the number of poppy-free provinces fell in 2015, specifically in the Northern region with Balkh losing that status which it had regained in 2014.

The survey shows that Hilmand, remains the country’s major opium-cultivating province, followed by Farah, Kandahar, and Badghis.

Angela Me, Chief of UNODC Statistics and Surveys Section, said “particularly for Kandahar where I showed you earlier, you will see a decrease in the estimates of almost 40%. Actually that’s where it is not as big as we have in the new estimate but definitely there was still a decrease. So the trend, I think we can comfortably say with precision that there was a change.”

Meanwhile, Zahir Tanin Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations said, “we have a very strong mandate from the people of Afghanistan to eradicate, to fight narcotics. The message has been very strong and very direct and this is why the political will within the government is at the heist at the moment. This is why the figures associated with drug production and trafficking will not be tolerated within the government of Afghanistan.”

However, he added “if we do get a chance to have peace we do have the tools to fight and to introduce alternative livelihood. Where we don’t it doesn’t matter how successful how alternative livelihood is, nothing is working.”
Category