UN / SAFE SCHOOLS

18-Mar-2015 00:02:45
UN Special Envoy on Education, Gordon Brown, said that it is time to “end the shameful breeches of international law that are violating the rights of millions of children” and insist that, even in conflict zones, there are properly resourced safe schools which enable children to receive an education in peace. UNIFEED-UNTV
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STORY: UN / SAFE SCHOOLS
TRT: 02:46
SOURCE: UNIFEED-UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 18 MARCH 2015, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, exterior of UNHQ
2. Wide shot, Brown entering the press conference
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Gordon Brown, UN Special Envoy for Global Education:
“And we have got to wake up to the fact that in the sixties we fought this huge battle for civil rights; in the eighties we fought this huge battle against apartheid; here, in 2015, there is a civil rights struggle underway for the rights of children, who’s rights have been neglected, who can easily be forced into child labour, child marriage, child trafficking, who are denied the very basic right of education, and the world has been virtually silent. And one of the reasons I’m here today is to say that this cannot go on. We cannot turn our backs on the needs of children, who are the victims of war but are not listened to.”
4. Med shot, reporters at the press conference
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Gordon Brown, UN Special Envoy for Global Education:
“We should not forget that today there are 28 million children who are denied even the most basic chance of a right to education in some of the most troubled and poorest countries of the world and it is our duty, not just because there are international laws to protect children against violence, but it is our moral duty to make sure that every single child in the world can enjoy the basic right to education free of terror, free of fear, and with the support of the international community.”
6. Wide shot, press conference
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Gordon Brown, UN Special Envoy for Global Education:
“The average amount of time that people spend as refugees or in camps, if they are dispossessed people, if they’re forced out of their own country, is about ten years. So a child could go through the whole of their potential school years without ever having the chance to go to school.”
8. Med shot, reporter asking a question
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Gordon Brown, UN Special Envoy for Global Education:
“And this project in Lebanon symbolizes to me the reason why we are failing to do enough. It is not that there is not capacity. It is that there is not the funds and political will to make that happen, and we’ve got to get a message across the world that for a very small amount of money, you could actually change the lives of half a million children in a country where there is the potential for them to be at a school but there is not the money to put them there.”
10. Med shot, reporter asking a question
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Gordon Brown, UN Special Envoy for Global Education:
“But these initiatives, making our schools safer, a humanitarian fund for education in emergencies, new guidelines that prevent the militarization of schools and treat them like hospitals, now these are the ways forward. And really it’s sad that 70 years after the universal declaration of human rights we’re having to come to a conference in New York today to talk about the basic rights of children, who’s rights have been neglected for too long.”
12. Wide shot, Brown exiting the press conference
STORYLINE
UN Special Envoy on Education, Gordon Brown, said that it is time to “end the shameful breeches of international law that are violating the rights of millions of children” and insist that, even in conflict zones, there are properly resourced safe schools which enable children to receive an education in peace.

Brown said that terror attacks on schools are at the highest rate in 40 years with 10 thousand attacks in the past 5 years alone. Yet there is still very little clarity about the guidelines that would ensure that schools have the same protection as hospitals under the Geneva Convention.

Brown said “we have got to wake up to the fact that in the sixties we fought this huge battle for civil rights; in the eighties we fought this huge battle against apartheid; here, in 2015, there is a civil rights struggle underway for the rights of children, who’s rights have been neglected, who can easily be forced into child labour, child marriage, child trafficking, who are denied the very basic right of education, and the world has been virtually silent.”

The Special Envoy proposed a global fund for education in emergencies. He reminded that 28 million children in emergency and conflict areas were not in schools, yet less than %1 of aid goes to education. He said that while food and healthcare aid are important for people to survive, education is what will ensure their future.

He added that “it is our moral duty to make sure that every single child in the world can enjoy the basic right to education free of terror, free of fear, and with the support of the international community.”

Brown said that special attention must be given to Syrian refugees. He unveiled an agreement with the Lebanese government that would see Syrian children being educated in the same facilities as their Lebanese counterparts in different shifts.

He said that “this project in Lebanon symbolizes to me the reason why we are failing to do enough. It is not that there is not capacity. It is that there is not the funds and political will to make that happen, and we’ve got to get a message across the world that for a very small amount of money, you could actually change the lives of half a million children in a country where there is the potential for them to be at a school but there is not the money to put them there.”

Brown also announced a pilot project in Pakistan under the Safe Schools Initiative, already operating in Nigeria, which uses new technology to ensure that schools are safer.

The UN Envoy said that “making our schools safer, a humanitarian fund for education in emergencies, new guidelines that prevent the militarization of schools and treating them like hospitals” are the ways forward.

He said it is “sad that 70 years after the universal declaration of human rights we’re having to come to a conference in New York today to talk about the basic rights of children, who’s rights have been neglected for too long.”
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