UN / WORLD TOILET DAY

19-Nov-2014 00:02:33
In an effort to break the silence on open defecation, the UN is highlighting the issue on World Toilet Day on November 19th. The UN says defecating in the open can cause serious health concerns and expose women to sexual violence. UNIFEED-UNTV
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STORY: UN / WORLD TOILET DAY
TRT: 2.33
SOURCE: UNIFEED-UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 19 NOVEMBER 2014, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
1. Tilt down, UN headquarters to inflated toilet
2. Wide shot, street with poster “toilets save lives” in foreground
3. Wide shot, toilet and UN building
4. Med shot, passers-by taking photos of the toilet
5. Close up, toilet and UN flag in the back
6. Wide shot, press room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Karen Tan, Permanent Representative of Singapore to the United Nations:
“We feel that there are still a lot of need to build awareness about this problem. Last year, when we tabled the resolution there were you know, lots of sniggers and says “what about the toilet?. But, I think if you noticed this year it’s been quite a lot of coverage and it’s a different approach.”
8. Wide shot, presser
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Jarraud, Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Organization:
“In many countries inadequate water and sanitation policies and practices are fuelling the spread of the disease and right now poor condition in water, sanitation and hygiene –called WASH- specially at health facilities has been exacerbating, including the spread of the Ebola disease.”
10. Med shot, journalists
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan Eliasson, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“There’s so many reasons to get involved in this issue, first of all to realize that the sanitation goal is one of the most lagging of the MDGs. Strange enough although it’s so obvious that we have to do it and that it can be done, and we also know that in the new set of goals being considered by Member States sanitation is figuring very high.”
12. Med shot, journalist asking question
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Jan Eliasson, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations:
“For me, this has been a bit of a personal commitment since I was [ ] I actually saw children dying in front of me in Somalia back in 1992 out of dehydration and diarrhoea and I think the least we can do –we have seen that- is that we stay focused on this issue and I’ve tried to live up to it by raising my glass –wear the right hand- this is a luxury for 780 million people, 2.5 billion people don’t have sanitation, and 1.1 billion defecate in the open. That’s why 2.000 children every day die before the age of five.”
13. Wide shot, dais
14. Wide shot, inflatable toilet in front of the UN Headquarters
15. Med shot, UPSOUND: “Happy World Toilet Day! Because toilets save lives!”
STORYLINE
In an effort to break the silence on open defecation, the UN is highlighting the issue on World Toilet Day on November 19th.
The UN says defecating in the open can cause serious health concerns and expose women to sexual violence.

Over one billion people around the world are expected to be provided access to toilet facilities as part of a UN campaign.
Eighty-two per cent of the 1 billion people practicing open defecation live in just 10 countries: India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Sudan, Niger, Nepal, China, and Mozambique. The numbers of people practicing open defecation are still rising in 26 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, though they have declined in Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. In Nigeria, numbers of open defecators increased from 23 million in 1990 to 39 million in 2012.

Globally, some 1.9 billion people have gained access to improved sanitation since 1990. However, progress has not kept up with population growth and the Millennium Development Goal target on sanitation is unlikely to be reached by 2015 at current rates of progress.

Speaking to reporters in New York, Karen Tan, Permanent Representative of Singapore to the United Nations said ‘we feel that there are still a lot of need to build awareness about this problem. Last year, when we tabled the resolution there were you know, lots of sniggers and says “what about the toilet?. But, I think if you noticed this year it’s been quite a lot of coverage and it’s a different approach.”

Michel Jarraud, Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Organization, said “in many countries inadequate water and sanitation policies and practices are fueling the spread of the disease and right now poor condition in water, sanitation and hygiene –called WASH- specially at health facilities has been exacerbating, including the spread of the Ebola disease.”

Also speaking in the press conference, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations Jan Eliasson said “there’s so many reasons to get involved in this issue, first of all to realize that the sanitation goal is one of the most lagging of the MDGs. Strange enough although it’s so obvious that we have to do it and that it can be done, and we also know that in the new set of goals being considered by Member States sanitation is figuring very high.”

He stressed “for me, this has been a bit of a personal commitment”, adding “I actually saw children dying in front of me in Somalia back in 1992 out of dehydration and diarrhoea and I think the least we can do –we have seen that- is that we stay focused on this issue and I’ve tried to live up to it by raising my glass –wear the right hand- this is a luxury for 780 million people, 2.5 billion people don’t have sanitation, and 1.1 billion defecate in the open. That’s why 2.000 children every day die before the age of five.”

World Toilet Day was established by the “Sanitation for All” resolution, adopted by the UN General Assembly in July 2013, designating 19 November as World Toilet Day. The Day is coordinated by UN-Water in collaboration with Governments and relevant stakeholders.
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