SOMALIA / FUNDING

30-Jun-2014 00:03:35
Three United Nations (UN) emergency directors have called for more sustained funding for Somalia nearly three year after the worst famine hit the Horn of Africa nation. UNICEF
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STORY: SOMALIA / FUNDING
TRT: 3.35
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS
DATELINE: 26 JUNE 2014 DOLOW, SOMALIA
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, airplane landing
2. Med shot, people getting into car
3. Med shot, car driving
4. Close up, Dominique Burgeon in car
5. Med shot, driving by village
6. Wide shot, market
7. Med shot, boy with donkeys
8. Close up, hands working
9. Med shot, farm workers

10. SOUNDBITE: FAO Emergency Director Dominique Burgeon:
“So here FAO has been promoting and that has been making the technical expertise as well as the input available to the farming communities, to the cooperatives and working in close cooperation with WFP. So that WFP through fresh food vouchers system can make sure that this type of food is made available to the population and UNICEF also coming on board making sure hat the nutritional education goes together at the same time.”
11. Close up, woman working
12. Med shot, woman working
13. Med shot Burgeon watching workers
14. Med shot, workers
15. SOUNDBITE WFP Emergency Director David Kaatrud:
“Part of the reason that I am here with my counterparts from UNCEF and FAO, who believe so strongly in this approach, will be to make advocacy, demonstrating that this which is essentially a pilot, an initial effort, needs to be taken at scale in a vulnerable country like Somalia to break cycles of vulnerability and build recilience. So we will be a part of that resource mobilisation effort. However, we are realistic. It is a tough time in the world with Syria, Iraq, CAR, South Sudan. It is a tough time to raise resources but we can make a very compelling case from what we’ve seen today and what you see behind me at the moment.”
16. Med shot, sign OTP center
17. Med shot, people in Kabasa IDP camp
18. OTS, Ted Chaiban observing maternity training and malnutrition assessment
19. Wide shot, Ted Chaiban observing maternity training and malnutrition assessment
20. Close Up, woman and baby
21. Med shot, scale
22. Med shot, baby being weighed
23. Med shot, Ted Chaiban listening to woman
24. Close up, child arm measured
25. Med shot, mother and child
26. SOUNDBITE, Ted Chaiban, UNICEF Director of Emergencies:
“We saw today the importance of both training community health workers, building capacity on the ground so that they can respond to diseases, specifically those that affect under-5 children. We also saw an outpatient therapeutic programme, where the treatment of severe acute malnutrition is occurring at the community level, right at the doorstep of families. We here have malnutrition levels of 14 per cent. It is very exciting to see this because this builds capacity at community level to respond to these diseases, to respond to malnutrition.”
27. Med shot, rations distribution area
28. Close up, rations
29. Med shot, children
30. Med shot, woman and children
31. Close up, smiling woman
STORYLINE
Three United Nations (UN) emergency directors have called for more sustained funding for Somalia nearly three year after the worst famine hit the Horn of Africa nation.

Dominique Burgeon of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), David Kaatrud of the UN’s World Food Programme (WFP) and Ted Chaiban of the UN’s Children’s Fund (UNICEF), visited a number of projects in Dollow, southern Somalia under the joint resilience strategy involving FAO, WFP and UNICEF.

FAO, WFP and UNICEF share the same goal of strengthening resilience in Somalia and reaffirmed their commitment to play a key role for mobilizing change through resilience enhancement while prioritizing the most vulnerable in the region.

SOUNDBITE: FAO Emergency Director Dominique Burgeon:
“So here FAO has been promoting and that has been making the technical expertise as well as the input available to the farming communities, to the cooperatives and working in close cooperation with WFP. So that WFP through fresh food vouchers system can make sure that this type of food is made available to the population and UNICEF also coming on board making sure hat the nutritional education goes together at the same time.”


In July 2011, the UN declared famine in two regions based on analysis by FAO’s Food and Nutrition Analysis Unit and FEWS NET. Later that year, the declaration was extended to other regions. After a substantial increase in emergency assistance, a sharp decline in local cereal prices, and an excellent long rainy season, food security improved.

The UN declared the famine’s end in February 2012. Currently in the offing, a sweet potato initiative introduced initially for fodder but now well adopted by the communities for both fodder and sweet potatoes for human consumption. However, as FAO braces for a broader rollout of the Sweet Potato Initiative, Burgeon warned that funding shortfalls threaten this potential success story.

FAO’s programme interventions in southern Somalia are geared towards protecting people’s livelihood assets, recovery from crisis and enhancing resilience to shocks. The interventions ensure access to agriculture, livestock and fisheries inputs, prevention and control of livestock diseases and support to alternative livelihood strategies.

WFP’s interventions are targeting about 165,000 beneficiaries per month, covering parts of areas of Gedo, Lower Juba, Bay and Bakool regions. The agency’s activities are focused on increasing a voucher-based resilience safety net.

SOUNDBITE WFP Emergency Director David Kaatrud:
“Part of the reason that I am here with my counterparts from UNCEF and FAO, who believe so strongly in this approach, will be to make advocacy, demonstrating that this which is essentially a pilot, an initial effort, needs to be taken at scale in a vulnerable country like Somalia to break cycles of vulnerability and build recilience. So we will be a part of that resource mobilisation effort. However, we are realistic. It is a tough time in the world with Syria, Iraq, CAR, South Sudan. It is a tough time to raise resources but we can make a very compelling case from what we’ve seen today and what you see behind me at the moment.”


Somalia has seen off and on war since the collapse of the state in 1991. Since then, diseases, recurrent droughts and floods have made life difficult for many Somalis, reducing their ability to cope.

SOUNDBITE, Ted Chaiban, UNICEF Director of Emergencies:
“We saw today the importance of both training community health workers, building capacity on the ground so that they can respond to diseases, specifically those that affect under-5 children. We also saw an outpatient therapeutic programme, where the treatment of severe acute malnutrition is occurring at the community level, right at the doorstep of families. We here have malnutrition levels of 14 per cent. It is very exciting to see this because this builds capacity at community level to respond to these diseases, to respond to malnutrition.”

This year, the UN is confronted with one of the lowest funded Consolidated Appeal Processes (CAP) in years, standing at 24 percent as of June 2014.

Approximately 857,000 Somalis require urgent and life-saving assistance and more than 2 million are facing food insecurity as a result of drought, deficient harvests and ongoing conflict in the country.
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