Florida attack must not divide us, says UN's Eliasson

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United Nations Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson called on the international community to exercise restraint after the Florida nightclub attack. Photo: UN Photo/Patrick Bertshmann

The attack on a Florida nightclub which left up to 50 people dead must not be allowed to create division in the fight against violent extremism, the UN Deputy Secretary-General has said.

Jan Eliasson made his comments in Geneva ahead of his address to the Human Rights Council to mark its 10th anniversary.

Mr Eliasson also spoke of the UN's plans to work more closely with the International Organization for Migration (IOM), which has just announced that China intends to join its ranks.

Daniel Johnson has more.

Before his speech to the Human Rights Council, UN Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson said his thoughts were with the victims of the nightclub attack in Orlando, Florida.

Innocent and mainly young men and women had been slain at random, but with a very clear purpose, he said.

"The intention of those who make these acts is to scare us, to make us identify other groups as the problem, as the enemies, and we should now be very, very strong in standing up for our own values,

Such attacks must not be allowed to create divisions in the international community, Mr Eliasson said, in a call for restraint from those affected by the violence.

Later, the Deputy Secretary-General said he welcomed the news that China intends to join the International Organization for Migration (IOM).

This development fits with the UN's plans to bring the issue of migration and refugees to the fore and to work much more closely with IOM in future.

In addition to 60 million refugees and internally displaced people around the world, there are also 244 million migrants, Mr Eliasson said.

Duration: 1’04″

 

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