60,000 women and girls treated for fistula in developing world

Three young women patients wait to check-in for treatment, under a tent in the compound of the Fistula Unit of Zalingei Hospital in Sudan. UN Photo/Fred Noy

Around 60,000 women and girls in the developing world have benefitted from a programme initiated by the United Nations Population Fund, UNFPA to treat obstetric fistula.

Obstetric fistula is a hole between the vagina and rectum or bladder that is caused by prolonged obstructed labour.

It leaves the woman incontinent and unable to control the flow of urine or feces or both.

It is estimated that around two million women and girls in the poorest parts of the world are living with the fully preventable condition.

Saturday marks the International Day to End Fistula.

Cathrine Hasselberg spoke with Erin Anastasi from the United Nations Population Fund, UNFPA, about the social and physical consequences of the condition.

Duration: 3'53"

Filed under Today's Features.
UN Radio Daily News Programme
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