Public-private partnerships needed to combat transnational cyber-crime

Listen /

Photo/UN DPI

A strong partnership between the public and private sectors is needed in order to beat transnational cyber-crime.

That's according to a senior director of the tech company Microsoft, who was speaking at the 13th UN Crime Congress currently underway in Doha Qatar.

The circulation of child pornography is one of the issues that the international community is trying to clamp down on as Cathrine Hasselberg reports.

Over 1.8 billion images are uploaded and shared over the Internet daily. A percentage of those are illegal pictures depicting child pornography.

Microsoft has developed a new tool called Photo DNA, that is being provided free of charge to crime enforcement agencies across the world. The software blocks access to images of child abuse online.

Dale Waterman, the head of the Microsoft Digital Crime Unit for Middle East and Africa says beating the child pornographers and other cyber criminals requires a joint effort.

"The partnership between private and public sector is crucial, it's fundamental. The problem is so big, that there is no way that one entity could manage it, and that's why in Microsoft we would be working with law enforcement , with the banking sector, we are working with ISPs (Internet Service Providers), because you genuinely need the full court press from everyone who is concerned to make sure than we can make an impact."

Child pornography is just one example of cyber-crime.

Microsoft estimates that every year some 3.3 million US citizens are victims of various technology scams, suffering losses estimated at over US$ 1.5 billion.

Cathrine Hasselberg, United Nations

Duration: 1’14″

UN Radio Daily News Programme
UN Radio Daily News Programme
Updated at 1800 GMT, Monday to Friday
Loading the player ...

CONNECT

 

October 2017
M T W T F S S
« Sep    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031