Disaster-related deaths in Asia-Pacific rise three-fold in past decade

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Typhoon Haiyan left an estimated 1.1 million cubic metres of debris in Tacloban City alone. Credit: OCHA/Jose Reyna

Disaster-induced deaths in the Asia-Pacific region rose more than three-fold in the past decade, largely due to extreme disasters, according to an annual statistics publication.

Released by the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), the report also shows that the region has the highest number of natural disasters in the world.

Between 1994 and 2013, over 40 per cent of all reported natural disasters occurred there.

Among the Asia-Pacific sub-regions, South-East Asia, predominantly Indonesia and the Philippines, was hardest hit with 527 incidences in the past 20 years, killing more than 350,000 people.

During the same period, the number of natural disasters occurring in China alone was 285, which was more than twice as high as that in North and Central Asia.

ESCAP notes that although one billion people escaped extreme poverty since 1990 in Asia and the Pacific, 933 million people are living on between $1.25 and $2 a day.

Stephanie Coutrix, United Nations.

Duration:  1’09″

 

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