Global learning crisis costs governments $129 billion a year

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Afghan school children attend class (UN Photo/Fardin Waezi)

Governments around the world are losing $129 billion a year on poor quality education that is failing to ensure that children learn.

That's according to a report launched by the UN Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) on Wednesday.

The report says that 10 per cent of global spending on poor quality education leaves one in four young people in poor countries unable to read a single sentence.

Vibeke Jensen is Director of the UNESCO Office in New York.

"This 11th Education for All Global Monitoring Report reveals that despite the spending of $129 billion a year on education worldwide, 250 million children are still failing to learn the basics and out of those 250 million, the worrying information is that 125 to 130 million of those children actually have gone to school and completed the first four years." (27")

The UNESCO report concludes that good teachers are the key to improvement and calls on governments to provide the best in the profession to those who need them most.

It warns that without attracting and adequately training enough teachers, the learning crisis will last for several generations and hit the disadvantaged hardest.

Derrick Mbatha, United Nations.

Duration:1’32′

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