Law of Sea Convention turns 30

Tokelau has no airstrip or harbour. Visitors are ferried on smaller boats by the local workforce between the atolls and the ships anchored off shore UN Photo/Ariane Rummery.

From oil to tin, diamonds to gravel, metals to fish, the resources of the oceans and the sea are enormous, says the United Nations Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea.

But a combination of competing demands for lucrative fish stocks, spreading pollution that damaged sea life and growing tensions between coastal nations, has threatened to transform the oceans into another arena for conflict and instability.

United Nations member States agreed to address the problem. The Law of the Sea Convention was the result. The Convention is 30 years old this year.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is on Sunday participating at the Yeosu International Conference to commemorate the opening for signature of the convention.

Gerry Adams spoke with Kyong Chung of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Korea, about the significance of the Law of the Sea Convention.

Duration: 2’58″

Filed under Today's Features.
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