WMO explains recent cold snap in Europe

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A park on the banks of Lake Geneva, Switzerland covered in ice

The recent cold snap across Europe was caused by polar air blowing from northern Russia, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) reports.

WMO says the cold air came on the south flank of an extensive high pressure area, resulting in sudden cooling.

Clare Nullis is with the WMO:

"So the temperatures in—and forgive my pronunciation—Svalbard, which is far north in the Arctic, were repeatedly around final degrees in that time. So if you were far north in the Arctic, it was actually warmer than being in Milano or in Istanbul."
Duration:  14″

 

WMO on Tuesday released a detailed analysis of the extremely cold spell that hit Europe in the second half of January after unusually mild weather in December and early January.

For example, in Sweden, Finland and Russia, the mercury hit -40 °C, and parts of northern Italy saw -15 °C days.  Meanwhile, the Arctic region recorded milder temperatures.

Filed under Today's News.
UN Radio Daily News Programme
UN Radio Daily News Programme
Updated at 1800 GMT, Monday to Friday
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