WHO / DEMENTIA

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ENGLISH 07-Dec-2017 00:03:05
As the global population ages, the number of people living with dementia is expected to triple from 50 million to 152 million by 2050, according to the World Health Organization (WHO.) WHO
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STORY: WHO / DEMENTIA
TRT: 03:05
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 07 DECEMBER 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, Dr Tarun Dua and interviewing looking at documents
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tarun Dua, of WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse:
“Dementia affects large number people worldwide. Today there are around 50 million people affected by dementia and the estimates show that the number is going to be more than triple by 2050.”
3. Med shot, Dr Tarun Dua and interviewing looking at documents
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tarun Dua, of WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse:
“There are many forms of dementia, for example Alzheimer’s Disease is the most comment type of dementia. Another form of dementia is vascular dementia. Now what happens in all these types of dementia, a person might have a memory problem, for example you might forget where you kept the key, or what you did yesterday, or there might be behaviour problems such as wondering, and there are problems with the functioning activities of daily living.”
5. Close up, interviewer
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tarun Dua, of WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse:
“Dementia currently causes a huge burden and impact in society, communities and families. The cost due to the medical care, the cost due to social care also cost due to the informal caregiving is very high, it is estimated to be more than 800 billion US dollars annually globally. That means that countries need to invest in providing in providing care for people with dementia, in addition we need governments, philanthropic foundations and other stakeholders, including scientist and others to invest in finding a cure for dementia.”
7. Med shot, Dr Tarun Dua and interviewing looking at documents
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tarun Dua, of WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse:
“WHO is launching the Global Dementia Observatory. It is the first ever dementia global monitoring system. It includes data on what countries are doing on policy for dementia, what are the services available in the country and what kind of research is happening on dementia and what is the burden and impact of dementia on a national level. This Global Dementia Observatory will help countries to strengthen their services, strengthen their health and social care systems so that people with dementia, their carers are able to the care they need and are able to live with better functioning and better quality of life.”
9. Med shot, Dr Tarun Dua and interviewing looking at documents
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tarun Dua, of WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse:
“For dementia, currently there is no cure, but much more can be done to provide care and support with people with dementia. This requires a comprehensive, multisectoral response by the health sector, but by other sectors also such as social services, by the employment sector, by the urban health sector as well as many other sectors. But also, what it requires is investment in preventing dementia or reducing the risks, for example, some of the common risk factors are lifestyle risk factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, smoking, harmful use of alcohol. Many of these risk factors, which are for non-communicable diseases, are also the same risk factors for dementia.”
11. Med shot, Dr Tarun Dua and interviewing looking at documents

STORYLINE:


As the global population ages, the number of people living with dementia is expected to triple from 50 million to 152 million by 2050, according to the World Health Organization (WHO.)

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tarun Dua, of WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse:
“Dementia affects large number people worldwide. Today there are around 50 million people affected by dementia and the estimates show that the number is going to be more than triple by 2050.”

Dementia is an umbrella term for several diseases that are mostly progressive, affecting memory, other cognitive abilities and behaviour and interfering significantly with a person’s ability to maintain the activities of daily living. Women are more often affected than men. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia and accounts for 60–70 percent of cases. The other common types are vascular dementia and mixed forms.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tarun Dua, of WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse:
“There are many forms of dementia, for example Alzheimer’s Disease is the most comment type of dementia. Another form of dementia is vascular dementia. Now what happens in all these types of dementia, a person might have a memory problem, for example you might forget where you kept the key, or what you did yesterday, or there might be behaviour problems such as wondering, and there are problems with the functioning activities of daily living.”

The estimated annual global cost of dementia is US$ 818 billion, equivalent to more than 1 percent of global gross domestic product. The total cost includes direct medical costs, social care and informal care (loss of income of carers). By 2030, the cost is expected to have more than doubled, to US$ 2 trillion, a cost that could undermine social and economic development and overwhelm health and social services, including long-term care systems.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tarun Dua, of WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse:
“Dementia currently causes a huge burden and impact in society, communities and families. The cost due to the medical care, the cost due to social care also cost due to the informal caregiving is very high, it is estimated to be more than 800 billion US dollars annually globally. That means that countries need to invest in providing in providing care for people with dementia, in addition we need governments, philanthropic foundations and other stakeholders, including scientist and others to invest in finding a cure for dementia.”

The Global Dementia Observatory, a web-based platform launched by WHO today, will track progress on the provision of services for people with dementia and for those who care for them, both within countries and globally. It will monitor the presence of national policy and plans, risk reduction measures and infrastructure for providing care and treatment. Information on surveillance systems and disease burden data is also included.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tarun Dua, of WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse:
“WHO is launching the Global Dementia Observatory. It is the first ever dementia global monitoring system. It includes data on what countries are doing on policy for dementia, what are the services available in the country and what kind of research is happening on dementia and what is the burden and impact of dementia on a national level. This Global Dementia Observatory will help countries to strengthen their services, strengthen their health and social care systems so that people with dementia, their carers are able to the care they need and are able to live with better functioning and better quality of life.”

The Plan provides a comprehensive blueprint for action, in areas including: dementia awareness and dementia-friendliness; reducing the risk of dementia; diagnosis, treatment and care; research and innovation; and support for dementia carers. It suggests concrete actions that can be taken by policy-makers, health- and social-care providers, civil society organizations and people with dementia and their careers. The Plan has been developed with attention to the importance of respecting the human rights of people with dementia and engaging them in planning for their care. Targets against which progress can be measured are included.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tarun Dua, of WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse:
“For dementia, currently there is no cure, but much more can be done to provide care and support with people with dementia. This requires a comprehensive, multisectoral response by the health sector, but by other sectors also such as social services, by the employment sector, by the urban health sector as well as many other sectors. But also, what it requires is investment in preventing dementia or reducing the risks, for example, some of the common risk factors are lifestyle risk factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, smoking, harmful use of alcohol. Many of these risk factors, which are for non-communicable diseases, are also the same risk factors for dementia.”

To date, WHO has collected data from 21 countries of all income levels. By the end of 2018, it is expected that 50 countries will be contributing data.
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