MEXICO / MIGRATION COMPACT ARBOUR

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ENGLISH 06-Dec-2017 00:01:49
At the end of preparatory meetings on the Global Compact for Migration in the Mexican city of Puerto Vallarta, UN Special Representative for International Migration Louise Arbour said the question of whether the compact would infringe on state sovereignty “has been put to bed.” UNIC MEXICO
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STORY: MEXICO / MIGRATION COMPACT ARBOUR
TRT: 01:49
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 04, 06 DECEMBER 2017, PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO

SHOTLIST:

04 DECEMBER 2017, PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO

1. Tilt up shot, from Global Compact sign to audience

06 DECEMBER 2017, PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the Secretary General for International Migration, United Nations:
“Here, I think both the substance and the atmosphere were very important. There is a real atmosphere of engagement, of trust, I think of enthusiasm even though everybody understands how hard this is going to be; and on the substance, all the critical issues have been touched on.”

04 DECEMBER 2017, PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO

3. Wide shot, Mexican Foreign Minister clapping during conference

06 DECEMBER 2017, PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the Secretary General for International Migration, United Nations:
“And I think the question that has been raised often about whether this kind of compact would infringe on state sovereignty; this has been put to bed. This compact is based on a spirit of an agreement to cooperate. There is no question that Member States have their prerogative, in fact their responsibility, to control their borders, to decide who comes into their countries, under what terms; but what has come out of these meetings is that you cannot do that alone. Not a single Member State can control the movement of people across international borders without cooperation from neighbours and further away.”
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the Secretary General for International Migration, United Nations:
“And the economics are mind-boggling. Migrants spend about 85 percent of their income in the host country, and the 15 percent that they send home today represents 600 billion USD a year, about 450 of that going to developing countries. That amount is three times the amount of official development aid that wealthier countries send to developing countries. So, the economic powerhouse that migrants are, I think, has to be nourished and we have to capitalize on that force.”
04 DECEMBER 2017, PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO

6. Wide shot, Mexican Foreign Minister at podium

STORYLINE:

At the end of preparatory meetings on the Global Compact for Migration in the Mexican city of Puerto Vallarta, UN Special Representative for International Migration Louise Arbour said the question of whether the compact would infringe on state sovereignty “has been put to bed.”

In an interview today (06 Dec), Arbour said meetings in Puerto Vallarta were a transition between consolations and the hard work of negotiating a text. She said the meetings were marked by an atmosphere of engagement, trust, and “enthusiasm even though everybody understands how hard this is going to be.”

Arbour expect the co-facilitators, Mexico and Switzerland, to have a zero draft of the compact by the end of January following the issuance of a UN report on migration. She noted that although UN chief António Guterres supports the process, the compact will be owned by the UN Member States. Arbour stressed that countries involved in the negotiation understand that this is not a legally binding document, although it called for a lot of commitments which could be morally and politically binding.

SOUNDBITE (English) Louise Arbour, Special Representative of the Secretary General for International Migration, United Nations:
This compact based on a spirit of an agreement to cooperate. There is no question that Member States have their prerogative, in fact their responsibility, to control their borders, to decide who comes into their countries, under what terms; but what has come out of these meetings is that you cannot do that alone. Not a single Member State can control the movement of people across international borders without cooperation from neighbours and further away.”

The Special Representative said the world today has a much better understand of the positive significance of migration in economic terms. She said there are some 257 million migrants around the globe, overwhelmingly comprised of migrant workers who enjoy a higher rate of employment than the native populations. She said migrants spend about 85 percent of their income in the host country, and the 15 percent that they send home represents 600 billion USD a year, about 450 of that going to developing countries. She noted that this amount “is three times the amount of official development aid that wealthier countries send to developing countries; so, the economic powerhouse that migrants are, I think, has to be nourished and we have to capitalize on that force.”
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