GENEVA / DROWNED MIGRANTS

Preview Language:   Original
ENGLISH 11-Aug-2017 00:02:14
The International Organization for Migration (IOM) said seventy people are now believed dead in two incidents this week involving migrants being forced overboard by traffickers off the coast of Yemen. UNTV CH
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
Original
HD PAL
Original
HD NTSC
Original
SD PAL
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: GENEVA / DROWNED MIGRANTS
TRT: 02:14
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 11 AUGUST 2017 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

11 AUGUST 2017 GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Palais des Nations exterior
2. Wide shot, press room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Olivia Headon, Spokesperson, International Organization for Migration (IOM):
“A total number of 280 people were forced from two boats in two separate incidences, with up to 70 people presumed dead. That includes the bodies that our staff witnessed on the beach and the people who are still missing, presumed dead.”
4. Med shot, journalist
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Olivia Headon, Spokesperson, International Organization for Migration (IOM):
“It takes five to seven days to get to the border of Yemen depending on which route you take. It is likely that these migrants are still inside Yemen. The routes through the country are changing all the time. The migrants preferred not to stay in one place, as they are often quite afraid of being held in detention.”
6. Med shot, journalists
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Olivia Headon, Spokesperson, International Organization for Migration (IOM):
“If you look at our press release from yesterday you will see a detailed account from the survivors of the situation on the boat where they talk about not being allowed to move, not being allowed to fulfil their basic needs, having to urinate on themselves, being beaten if they moved, being held at gunpoint, being forced into the water violently.”
8. Zoom out shot, journalist
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Olivia Headon, Spokesperson, International Organization for Migration (IOM):
“What I can say that within Yemen, people who have made it on the boats and are making the journey through Yemen, they are often held for ransom again. What typically happens is that you have smuggler networks. You have one who brings you to the country, and you are supposed to meet another one within the country. What has typically been happening is that the second smuggler group would have been on the beach or closer to the beach, and that is not what happened the last two days. People were sort of left to fend for themselves and find either their own way through the country or find another smuggling group further inland, if you will.”
10. Wide shot, journalists
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Olivia Headon, Spokesperson, International Organization for Migration (IOM):
“They are subject to the same things that they are subject to on the way to Yemen, which is abuse, rape, being held for ransom so that their families at home have to spend, and find somehow of paying more money than they can afford.”
12. Wide shot, journalists
13. Close up, camerawoman
14. Close up, journalist

STORYLINE:

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) said seventy people are now believed dead in two incidents this week involving migrants being forced overboard by traffickers off the coast of Yemen.

IOM spokesperson Olivia Headon told reporters in Geneva today (11 Aug) that some 280 people were forced from the two boats. She added that IOM staff had helped the migrants who had made it to shore in the Shabwa governorate, but were no longer in contact with them.

The Migrants are believed to have headed towards Yemen’s border with the Gulf states to find work.

SOUNDBITE (English) Olivia Headon, Spokesperson, International Organization for Migration (IOM):
“It takes five to seven days to get to the border of Yemen depending on which route you take. It is likely that these migrants are still inside Yemen. The routes through the country are changing all the time. The migrants preferred not to stay in one place, as they are often quite afraid of being held in detention.”

Since January, IOM estimates that around 55,000 migrants left the Horn of Africa for Yemen, more than 30,000 of whom are are under 18 from Somalia and Ethiopia. It is also estimated that one-third are female. The smuggling of migrants to Yemen continues despite the ongoing conflict in the country, which is also in the grip of a cholera epidemic that is infecting 5,000 people a day.

Headon described the conditions on board traffickers’ boats as dreadful as she recounted stories from survivors who talked about “not being allowed to move, not being allowed to fulfil their basic needs, having to urinate on themselves, being beaten if they move, being held at gunpoint, (and) being forced into the water violently.”

According to one migrant’s account, the tragedy happened this week when smugglers forced migrants into the water after seeing “authority-type” officials on the Yemeni shoreline.

SOUNDBITE (English) Olivia Headon, Spokesperson, International Organization for Migration (IOM):
“What I can say that within Yemen, people who have made it on the boats and are making the journey through Yemen, they are often held for ransom again. What typically happens is that you have smuggler networks. You have one who brings you to the country, and you are supposed to meet another one within the country. What has typically been happening is that the second smuggler group would have been on the beach or closer to the beach, and that is not what happened the last two days. People were sort of left to fend for themselves and find either their own way through the country or find another smuggling group further inland, if you will.”

The IOM spokesperson said migrants encountering the second set of smugglers inside Yemen often also faced “abuse, rape (and) being held for ransom.” She added that migrants paid smugglers up to 500 USD to travel from the Horn of Africa to Yemen, which is less than the cost for Libya to Europe route. However, Headson said the abuses endured by migrants usually meant that those travelling through Yemen ended up paying more to smugglers than those trying to get to Europe.
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNTV CH
Alternate Title
unifeed170811a
Asset ID
1948346