WHO / TOBACCO CONTROL

Preview Language:   Original
ENGLISH 10-Jan-2017 00:02:09
A new landmark global report says tobacco control policies, not only saves lives, but could also generate significant government revenues for health and development work. The tobacco industry and the deadly impact of its products cost the world’s economies more than US$ 1 trillion annually in healthcare expenditures and lost productivity. WHO / UNIFEED
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
Original
HD PAL
Original
HD NTSC
Original
SD PAL
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: WHO / TOBACCO CONTROL
TRT: 02:09
SOURCE: WHO / UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 10 JANUARY 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

WHO - 10 JANUARY 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Jeremias Paul discussing report
2. Close up, report
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Jeremias Paul, Head of Tobacco Control Economics Unit, World Health Organization (WHO):
“This monograph on tobacco control economics is significant in two ways. From a public health standpoint, tobacco use kills six million people every year, but from an economics standpoint, the cost of tobacco use is more than one trillion dollars every year for lost productivity and healthcare expenditures.”

10 JANUARY 2017, NEW YORK CITY

4. Close up, man smoking cigarette

WHO - 10 JANUARY 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Jeremias Paul, Head of Tobacco Control Economics Unit, World Health Organization (WHO):
“This monograph on tobacco control and economics can be used by governments to ramp up tobacco control. Tobacco control has been proven to be very cost effective. It not only saves lives, but significant (increases) taxes for example can generate substantial revenues.

10 JANUARY 2017, NEW YORK CITY

6. Close up, cigarette ash being flicked

WHO - 10 JANUARY 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Jeremias Paul, Head of Tobacco Control Economics Unit, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Low and middle income countries are particularly vulnerable because, one is that they have the highest growth of population, they represent a significant market for cigarettes and other tobacco products, and they also have very poor tobacco control measures, poor capacity, and very strong tobacco industry influence.”

10 JANUARY 2017, NEW YORK CITY

8. Close up, man takes a pull of smoke from cigarette

WHO - 10 JANUARY 2017, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Jeremias Paul, Head of Tobacco Control Economics Unit, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Tobacco control measures can easily be implemented in low and middle income countries, because they are very cost effective. These measures include significant tax and price increases, marketing bans on tobacco industry marketing, smoke free policies, pictorial warnings and the like.”

10 JANUARY 2017, NEW YORK CITY

10. Wide shot, smoking area sign with man smoking in background


STORYLINE:


The World Health Organization (WHO) said tobacco control policies, not only saves lives, but could also generate significant government revenues for health and development work.

In report released today (10 Jan), WHO said tobacco products cost the world’s economies more than US$ 1 trillion annually in healthcare expenditures and lost productivity and kill some six million people each year. WHO’s Head of Tobacco Control Economics Unit Jeremias Paul said low and middle income countries were “particularly vulnerable” due to their high population growth rates, “poor tobacco control measures, poor capacity, and very strong tobacco industry influence.” He said cost effective measures could “easily be implemented” in these countries including significant tax and price increases, marketing bans on tobacco industry marketing, smoke free policies, and pictorial warnings among others.

The almost 700-page monograph, produced in collaboration with the US National Cancer Institute, found that among the 1.1 billion smokers age 15 and up, around 80 percent live in low and middle income countries with 226 million living in poverty. It concluded that if all countries increased taxes by about US$0.80 per pack, revenues from cigarettes globally could increase by 47 percent, or US$ 140 billion.
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Creator
WHO
Alternate Title
unifeed170110c
Asset ID
1811189