WORLD BANK / DIGITAL POOR

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ENGLISH 13-Jan-2016 00:02:51
A new World Bank Group report says that despite the rapid spread of digital technologies through the developing world, the anticipated digital dividends of higher growth, more jobs, and better public services are falling short of expectations. WORLD BANK
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STORY: WORLD BANK / DIGITAL POOR
TRT: 02:50
SOURCE: WORLD BANK
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/ NATS
DATELINE: 13 JANUARY 2016, WASHINGTON DC /FILE

SHOTLIST:

2013 – SENEGAL

1. Medium shot, woman working on computer

2013 – ZAMBIA

2. Medium shot, people working on computers

2012 – RWANDA

3. Wide shot, people walking along dirt road
4. Wide shot, urban landscape with people walking along road

2014 – INDIA

5. Close up, man looking down at cellphone
6. Close up, man typing on cellphone

2015 – PERU

7. Medium shot, women working on computers

13 JANUARY 2016, WASHINGTON DC

8. SOUNDBITE (English) President Jim Yong Kim, World Bank Group:
“The World Development Report is focused on something we call digital dividends. You know the digital world has exploded. Every day there are 4 billion google searches. But there are still 4 billion people who are really not getting access to the internet and receiving the full benefits. So what we know is that while it’s spreading quickly, it’s not spreading evenly. It’s not spreading especially to the poorest. So we are making very specific recommendations for what countries can do to help their citizens actually begin to reap the benefits, the dividends, of the digital revolution.”

2013 - SOUTH AFRICA

9. Close up, man typing on cellphone
10. Medium shot, man typing on cellphone

2013 – ZAMBIA

11. Medium shot, man using cellphone

2015 – PERU

12. Medium shot, woman writing web code on computer
13. Close up, woman writing web code on computer

13 JANUARY 2016, WASHINGTON DC

14. SOUNDBITE (English) President Jim Yong Kim, World Bank Group:
“You know we’re already seeing a lot of great examples of how the internet and the digital revolution have helped countries. Alibaba is one example, where 8 million people now benefit from the Alibaba network and they’re actually selling things they make to the rest of the world and more than 60 percent are small or medium enterprises and the majority of the people participating are women. This is great news for China. We’re also seeing that mobile money has had a huge impact in countries in Africa, in fact some African countries were leaders, so people are able to send cash to their parents in far off regions that they never would have been able to do before. We’re seeing things like in health care, little SMS messages are helping HIV patients take their medications. So there are many, many benefits already. We think the way the world economy is changing, unless we get very aggressive in preparing developing countries to make the most out of the digital revolution, we’ll never be able to end poverty or boost shared prosperity.”

2015 – PERU

15. Medium shot, woman working on computer.
16. Wide shot, women working on computers

2013 – SENEGAL

17. Close up, person typing on computer
18. Medium shot, woman typing on computer

2013 – KENYA

19. Medium shot, man typing on computer
20. Close up, man typing on keyboard

STORYLINE:

A new World Bank Group report says that despite the rapid spread of digital technologies through the developing world, the anticipated digital dividends of higher growth, more jobs, and better public services are falling short of expectations.

The number of internet users worldwide has more than tripled since 2005 – to an estimated 3.5 billion users. However the new World Bank report says the rapid digital expansion has been skewed toward the wealthy. 60 percent of the world’s population is excluded.

SOUNDBITE (English) President Jim Yong Kim, World Bank Group:
“The World Development Report is focused on something we call digital dividends. You know the digital world has exploded. Every day there are 4 billion google searches. But there are still 4 billion people who are really not getting access to the internet and receiving the full benefits. So what we know is that while it’s spreading quickly, it’s not spreading evenly. It’s not spreading especially to the poorest. So we are making very specific recommendations for what countries can do to help their citizens actually begin to reap the benefits, the dividends, of the digital revolution.”

There are many individual success stories in the developing world. But the spread of digital technology is still less than expected.

SOUNDBITE (English) President Jim Yong Kim, World Bank Group:
“You know we’re already seeing a lot of great examples of how the internet and the digital revolution have helped countries. Alibaba is one example, where 8 million people now benefit from the Alibaba network and they’re actually selling things they make to the rest of the world and more than 60 percent are small or medium enterprises and the majority of the people participating are women. This is great news for China. We’re also seeing that mobile money has had a huge impact in countries in Africa, in fact some African countries were leaders, so people are able to send cash to their parents in far off regions that they never would have been able to do before. We’re seeing things like in health care, little SMS messages are helping HIV patients take their medications. So there are many, many benefits already. We think the way the world economy is changing, unless we get very aggressive in preparing developing countries to make the most out of the digital revolution, we’ll never be able to end poverty or boost shared prosperity.”

The World Bank suggests investing in basic infrastructure and supporting start-ups, as well as educating all children.
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