NIGERIA / SCHOOLS BOKO HARAM

Preview Language:   Original
ENGLISH 27-Nov-2015 00:03:28
The Nigerian government has pledged to try to re-open schools in the insurgent-hit north east of the country by the end of this year. Insurgents opposed to western education have systematically attacked schools throughout the area. UNHCR
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STORY: NIGERIA / SCHOOLS BOKO HARAM
TRT: 3:28
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: HAUSA / ENGLISH / NATS
DATELINE: 25-26 OCTOBER, 2015 – YOLA, MAIDUGURI, HOMS, NIGERIA

SHOTLIST:

26 OCTOBER 2015, YOLA, NIGERIA

1. Wide shot, IDP children walking to school
2. Med shot, children with bags walking to school
3. Wide shot, displaced boy Oumar Sanda walking to school
4. Med shot, Oumar Sanda walking to his class
5. Wide shot, Oumar Sanda a Nigerian IDP walking into class
6. SOUNDBITE (Hausa) OUMAR SANDA Internally Displaced Nigerian:
“When my family heard that Boko Haram was planning to attack they’d run to the hills to hide. I always used to look after our cattle and the day they actually attacked our village, my family had gone to hide and that's the last time I saw them.”
7. Med shot, Nigerian displaced children learning in a classroom
8. Med shot, Oumar Sanda at his desk getting ready for class
9. Wide shot, Oumar writing as the teach notes something on the blackboard
10. Close-up, Oumar’s eyes as he pays attention in class
11. Med shot, Oumar and other IDP children learning in class
12. Med shot, IDP teacher writing on the blackboard during class
13. Wide shot, teaching in class teaching
15. Close-up, IDP boy in class with pen in his mouth
16. Med shot, IDPs children in class learning

25 OCTOBER 2015, HOMS, NIGERIA

17. Wide shot, destroyed school building that had been occupied by Boko Haram
18. Med shot, big hole in a destroyed classroom wall
19. Wide shot, Pan from empty desk to destroyed classroom wall
20. Close-up, of big hole were a blackboard used to be
21. Wide shot, empty decks in the classroom

29 OCTOBER 2015, MAIDUGURI, NIGERIA

22. Wide shot, of Nigerian IDPs setting on a classroom corridor
23. Med shot, displaced families at the corridor
24. Wide shot, IDPs playing football outside a classroom

25 OCTOBER 2015, HOMS, NIGERIA

25. Close-up, school sign with bullet holes
26. Wide shot, pan of destroyed school building
27. Med shot, collapsed roof of a classroom
28. Close-up, destroyed roof of a classroom

29 OCTOBER 2015, MAIDUGURI, NIGERIA

29. SOUNDBITE (English) Alhaji Ahmed Satomi, Nigerian government official:
“Boko means school and Haram means forbidden. That is their belief. So the first thing they are calling people to do is to avoid western education and now they have subjected as a result of the insurgency more than 400,000 students out of school. So I am sure with the opening of the schools Boko Haram will not be happy at all. They will not be happy at all.”

26 OCTOBER 2015, YOLA, NIGERIA
30. Med shot, Oumar and other children in class
31. Close-up, tilt of Oumar writing in class
32. Med shot, displaced children in class
33. Close-up, of a youn g girls face
34. Med shot, girls in class learning
35. Med shot, Oumar in class
36. Med shot, teacher in class teaching
37. SOUNDBITE (Hausa) OUMAR SANDA Internally Displaced Nigerian:
“I want to be the President … President” Nothing less. But why? “If I am President, I will be able to help others less fortunate than myself”.
38. Med shot, Oumar and friends walking home
39. Med shot, Oumar as he walks home from school

STORYLINE:

The Nigerian government has pledged to try to re-open schools in the insurgent-hit north east of the country by the end of this year. Insurgents opposed to western education have systematically attacked schools throughout the area.
This has disrupted education by scaring students away from schools. In addition, many schools have become sites for people displaced by the conflict to live in, meaning many classes have had to stop. With help from international aid agency partners, including the UN refugee agency UNHCR, the government intends to change this situation.

The children are having fun now but this isn’t the happy-go-lucky place it seems.

In fact this school compound is a camp for displaced people – a refuge for some of the millions made homeless by the violent insurgency in northeastern Nigeria. The government didn’t have anywhere else to put them.

Classrooms have become cramped, dirty dormitories.

This is not a place of learning but a place to survive in.

In some other camps a few children are lucky enough to go to classes.

14 year old Oumar Sanda is one of them.

In truth, it would be wrong to say Oumar is lucky. He was torn from his family when he was captured by the insurgents.

SOUNDBITE (Hausa) OUMAR SANDA Internally Displaced Nigerian:
“When my family heard that Boko Haram was planning to attack they’d run to the hills to hide. I always used to look after our cattle and the day they actually attacked our village, my family had gone to hide and that's the last time I saw them.”

Oumar escaped from his captors in circumstances that are unclear. Confusion is not unusual in the fog of war.

But what is clear is that Oumar Sanda is lucky to have escaped, lucky now to be looked after by a Nigerian aid agency.

He escaped his captors. But like so many other Nigerian children in the northeast, he has years of lessons to catch up on.

In some parts of the north east school compounds have become actual battlegrounds.

Places of education were deliberately occupied and destroyed by the insurgents. Here, the Nigerian army had to fight hard to regain control.

With help from the UNHCR and other aid agency partners the Nigerian government plans to re-open as many schools as it can by the end of this year. The aim is to get children back to classes AND counter the ideology that destroyed their places of learning in the first place. An ideology spelt out in the name the insurgents came to be known by:

SOUNDBITE (English) Alhaji Ahmed Satomi, Nigerian government official:
“Boko means school and Haram means forbidden. That is their belief. So the first thing they are calling people to do is to avoid western education and now they have subjected as a result of the insurgency more than 400,000 students out of school. So I am sure with the opening of the schools Boko Haram will not be happy at all. They will not be happy at all.”

The last word should perhaps go to 14 year old Oumar Sanda who escaped capture and now wants to catch up on his schooling.

Nigerians are a people known for their irrepressible ambition, even in the face of adversity. Oumar Sanda is no exception. We asked him about his hopes for the future. They’re not modest; he wants the highest office in the land:

SOUNDBITE (Hausa) OUMAR SANDA Internally Displaced Nigerian:
“I want to be the President … President”

A fine goal, but it will require a few more years schooling to reach.
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UNHCR
Alternate Title
unifeed151127a
Asset ID
1519529