GENEVA / GREENHOUSE GAS REPORT

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ENGLISH 09-Nov-2015 00:02:49
Greenhouse gas concentrations hit another record, according to a new report issued by the World Meteorological Organisation in Geneva. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / GREENHOUSE GAS REPORT
TRT: 2:48
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS
DATELINE: 09 NOVEMBER 2015, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND/FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE/GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Aerial shot, Palais des Nations

09 NOVEMBER 2015, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Jarraud, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organisation (WMO):
“We have broken new records once again. Over the last 25 years, between 1990 and 2014, there was a 36 percent increase in the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases.”
4. Med shot, journalists
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Jarraud, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organisation (WMO):
”It is very important to realise that whatever we emit in the atmosphere will stay, of course not forever, but for a very long time, for centuries. So, this emphasize why it is important to act quickly, because if we don’t act quickly, what we emit will affect the next generation.”
6. Close up, writing
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Jarraud, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organisation (WMO):
”Eighty-three percent of the increase is due to CO2. So this is the real elephant in the room, and we have no chance to tackle climate change if we don’t tackle the emission of CO2.”
8. Med shot, journalists
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Jarraud, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organisation (WMO):
” We have spent already since the beginning of the industrial time more than 2/3 of our budget. We have spent it, we don’t any longer have it. We have no option. So the only margin we have is to play with the remaining 1/3 of potential emission. This is what we have left in our purse in a sense of a carbon budget. And we more we emit now, the less we shall have later”.
10. Close up, journalist
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Michel Jarraud, WMO Secretary-General:
”The sea level will continue to increase for centuries, even after we have managed to get a balance for the atmosphere. So this is why it is so important to reduce as much as possible. Of course, we would love to do what you are suggesting, to reduce it to one degree, even 1 ½ degree is virtually impossible any longer, and so 2 degrees is still feasible, but it requires quick and strong action.”
12. Pan on name tag
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Oksana Tarasova, Chief WMO Atmospheric Environment Research Division:
“The aim now is to act fast, to avoid the worst possible cases. And it is not just 2 degrees, life doesn’t end after we have reached 2 degrees, we can reach even higher temperatures if we do nothing. “
14. Close up, Greenhouse Gas Bulletin
15. Close up, table in Greenhouse Gas Bulletin
16. Med shot, journalists

STORYLINE:

Greenhouse gas concentrations hit another record, said the Greenhouse Gas Bulletin launched today (9 Nov) by the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) in Geneva.

Three weeks ahead of the UN climate change negotiations in Paris to be held from 30 November to 11 December, the WMO report provides a scientific base for decision-making.

WMO Secretary-General Michel Jarraud told reporters in Geneva, “we have broken new records once again. Over the last 25 years, between 1990 and 2014, there was a 36 % increase in the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases. “

This is due to long-lived greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from industrial, agricultural and domestic activities.

Jarraud stressed that ”it is very important to realize that whatever we emit in the atmosphere will stay, of course not forever, but for a very long time, for centuries. So, this emphasizes why it is important to act quickly, because if we don’t act quickly, what we emit will affect the next generation”.

The WMO report also highlights the interaction and amplification effect between rising levels of CO2 and water vapor, which is itself a major greenhouse gas, albeit short-lived. Warmer air holds more moisture and so increased surface temperatures caused by CO2 would lead to a rise in global water vapor levels, further adding to the greenhouse effect.

Jarraud explained, ”Eighty-three percent of the increase is due to CO2. So this is the real elephant in the room, and we have no chance to tackle climate change if we don’t tackle the emission of CO2”.

Carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere for hundreds of years an in the ocean for even longer. Past, present and future emissions will have a cumulative impact on both global warming and ocean acidification.

WMO’s Secretary-General noted that the laws of physics are non-negotiable.

He said, “We have spent already since the beginning of the industrial time more than 2/3 of our budget. We have spent it, we don’t any longer have it. We have no option. So the only margin we have is to play with the remaining 1/3 of potential emission. This what we have left in our purse in a sense of a carbon budget. And we more we emit now, the less we shall have later”.

Jarraud pointed out that CO2 is an invisible threat, but a real one. It means hotter global temperatures, more extreme weather events like heat waves and floods, melting ice, rising sea levels and increased acidity of the oceans.

He also said that ”the sea level will continue to increase for centuries, even after we have managed to get a balance for the atmosphere. So this is why it is so important to reduce as much as possible. Of course, we would love to do what you are suggesting, to reduce it to one degree, even 1 ½ degree is virtually impossible any longer, and so 2 degrees is still feasible, but it requires quick and strong action”.

Talking about the target to reduce the global warming of 2 degrees, Oksana Tarasova, Chief WMO Atmospheric Environment Research Division said that “the aim now is to act fast, to avoid the worst possible cases. And it is not just 2 degrees, life doesn’t end after we have reached 2 degrees, we can reach even higher temperatures if we do nothing. “

The WMO Greenhouse Gas Bulletin reports on atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, not emissions. Emissions represent what goes into the atmosphere whereas concentrations represent what remains in the atmosphere after the complex system of interactions between the atmosphere, biosphere, cryosphere and the oceans. About a quarter of the total emissions is taken up by the oceans and another quarter by the biosphere, reducing in this way the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere.
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